Is This the Most Significant Gold Discovery in Norway's History?

  • #1
pinball1970
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"Associate professor Håkon Reiersen with the museum said the gold pendants—flat, thin, single-sided gold medals called bracteates—date from around A.D. 500, the so-called Migration Period in Norway, which runs between 400 and about 550, when there were widespread migrations in Europe."

Found by an amateur enthusiast. Not too bad!

https://phys.org/news/2023-09-amateur-gold-century-norway.html?utm_source=webpush&utm_medium=push
 
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  • #2
Under Norwegian law, objects from before 1537, and coins older than 1650, are considered state property and must be handed in.

Bummer...
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
Bummer...
Yeah but come on. You find that and you are a piece of history.
 
  • #4
pinball1970 said:
Yeah but come on. You find that and you are a piece of history.
Yeah, I'd rather be rich :smile:
 
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  • #5
phinds said:
Yeah, I'd rather be rich :smile:
I'm sure he will get some sort of recompense.
 
  • #6
pinball1970 said:
I'm sure he will get some sort of recompense.
I read somewhere that he made a deal with Duracell and will get free batteries for his metal detector for life. :wink:
 
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  • #7
berkeman said:
I read somewhere that he made a deal with Duracell and will get free batteries for his metal detector for life. :wink:
Berkman. I expect better from you sir. ;)
 
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  • #8
berkeman said:
I read somewhere that he made a deal with Duracell and will get free batteries for his metal detector for life. :wink:
Do our Scandinavian guys have comment?
 
  • #9
A very cool find! :smile:
 
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