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Juggling Interview (Interview Requests)

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  1. Jul 1, 2015 #1

    WWGD

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    Hi, so I interviewed in one company, say Company1 on the 17th of June, and I was told by the interviewer that they would contact me for a second interview, which has not yet happened. I have secured an interview with Company2 . Now, I do not have a shining background, and this is a new area for me, so I am going for an entry-level or internship with both companies. Company 1 offers pay, Company 2 does not
    Question: how do ( or should I ) I bring up the fact of the interview with either company? I believe it is still mostly an employer's market, and additionally I am not a superstar, since I believe there is a relatively large pool of people that may be applying for similar positions. I need to have a job soon, reserves are running out.
    Any Ideas?
     
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  3. Jul 1, 2015 #2

    Choppy

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    Do you mean to ask how/whether you should bring up the fact that you are interviewing with another company?

    Generally speaking it's fair game to apply to an interview with more than one company simultaneously. Until one company is willing to extend a job offer to you, you have the right to entertain other possibilities.

    That said, you have to be careful with situations like this. Usually the problem comes in when the less desirable position is offered first and you have to face a choice of holding out for the more desirable one, or taking that which is offered. In such cases, you have a little bit of leverage in that you can go back to the more desirable position and tell them that you've got another offer on the table and see if they're willing to hurry up. Sometimes this can backfire.

    During the interview stage the best policy is probably not to bring it up unless asked specifically. And even then, you can answer in general terms. "Ideally I would like to work for this company, but I am exploring alternative options if this particular position doesn't work out." Be truthful if you are really pressed.
     
  4. Jul 2, 2015 #3

    WWGD

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    Thank you Choppy, my juggling did not work out as well as I hoped; I tried to schedule an interview a few days ahead so that I could wait to see if the ideal company followed up and I did not receive a reply from the interviewer . So I missed out on an unpaid internship, which I can hardly afford. But I agree, the goal should be to keep as many options open for as long as possible -- not always easy to do.
     
  5. Jul 2, 2015 #4

    Maylis

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    Just keep in mind that adage "a bird in the hand is better than two in the bush".
     
  6. Jul 3, 2015 #5
    Always a tough call. There are no perfect answers that will work every time. I really need to review a CV or resume to advise on how bold one should be based on the opportunity costs involved.

    My experience is that if one has geographical constraints, one cannot afford to be as bold as if one can move anywhere in the country.
     
  7. Jul 4, 2015 #6

    WWGD

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    Thank you, Dr. Courtney, All, good point, but fortunately for me at this point, living in the NY area, there are a good
    number of positions available, but your points are well-taken.
     
  8. Jul 4, 2015 #7
    It's always about supply and demand of talent. The areas right now where demand is outstripping supply are the west coast (esp silicon valley), Maryland, and the Atlanta area. Louisiana also has a big need for engineers, but these are specialized positions in the petrochemical industry that require specific backgrounds and are less likely to hire physics majors.

    In general, if a Physics major want to work as an engineer, his programming skills are his biggest asset. If you graduate with mediocre programming skills, the rest of your valuable learning is much harder for employers to utilize.
     
  9. Jul 4, 2015 #8

    WWGD

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    Thanks again. After considering the factors above, is it a given that one can negotiate for an upgrade (other than being paid, of course) when accepting an unpaid internship( I mean without even a stipend )?
    And is it reasonable to believe that a company that offers unpaid internships is likely to enslave those who accept them?
     
  10. Jul 4, 2015 #9
    In an unpaid internship, you are best trying to negotiate to get 1) the most useful experiences possible (look good on resume) 2) to work with people who will bless your future (recommendations) and 3) offer opportunities for co-authorships on papers.
     
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