Just a quick check for my solutions - ice patch friction

In summary, the skater would be traveling at 74.97 m/s after the rough patch and would need a patch that is 14335.09762m long in order to stop completely.
  • #1
47
0
SOLVED - Just a quick check for my solutions - ice patch friction

Homework Statement


Say you (65kg) take a brisk ice skate across a frictionless lake when suddenly you hit a rough patch of ice that's 10 m long with a coefficient of friction (0.02). If you were traveling at 75 m/s before you hit the patch, how fast would you be traveling ater the patch? How long would the patch have to be in order for you to stop?


Homework Equations



Work equations

The Attempt at a Solution



I got 74.97 m/s after the 10m ice-patch, that the ice-patch would need to be 14335.09762m long for you to stop completely, and as a bonus, I calculated the acceleration that you would experience to be -0.1962 m/s²

I just wanted to check if my answers are correct for this - thank you in advance :)
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
It seems roughly correct to me, but:
What you ALWAYS should include at PF are the EQUATIONS you use (many students get wrong answers because they miss out on that).

What you do NOT need to include is every step of the way from the equations to the final answers!
---
I'll make a check on your first (you can see if this agrees with how you did the problem!):

We need to determine WHEN the skater is past the rough patch:

We have then:
10 m=75m/s*t+1/2*(-0,02*g)*t^2

Then, let's say our solution time is T, we can find the velocity afterwards, by:
v=75-0.02*g*T
------------
If this is how you proceeded, I'm sure your answers are correct. :smile:
 
  • Like
Likes 1 person
  • #3
I used F = μ*g*m, multiplied that by 10 to get the work
Then calculated the acceleration work (mv²/2), subtracted the friction work from that, and calculated backwards to get the new v
For the length of the patch, I simply set friction work = acceleration work and for the acceleration itself I set acceleration work = m*a*s
 
  • #4
Hi Elpinetos, Welcome to Physics Forums.

It looks like you've made the right calculations. How many significant figures to report for each value is a bit of a puzzler, but five decimal places on the long patch of rough ice is definitely over the top :smile:
 
  • Like
Likes 1 person
  • #5
Elpinetos said:
I used F = μ*g*m, multiplied that by 10 to get the work
Then calculated the acceleration work (mv²/2), subtracted the friction work from that, and calculated backwards to get the new v
For the length of the patch, I simply set friction work = acceleration work and for the acceleration itself I set acceleration work = m*a*s
I was just about to say you didn't need that damn time, anyway; seems you made it all right on your own. :smile:
 
  • Like
Likes 1 person
  • #6
Thanks guys for your quick responses :)
 

What is "Just a quick check for my solutions - ice patch friction"?

"Just a quick check for my solutions - ice patch friction" is a phrase that refers to a scientific experiment or study that aims to measure the friction of ice patches on different surfaces.

Why is it important to study ice patch friction?

The study of ice patch friction is important because it can help us understand the safety and efficiency of different surfaces in icy conditions. This information can be used to improve transportation and prevent accidents.

How is ice patch friction measured?

Ice patch friction is typically measured using a device called a tribometer, which applies a controlled force to a surface and measures the resulting friction. Other methods, such as using a sled or ice skates, can also be used.

What factors affect ice patch friction?

There are several factors that can affect ice patch friction, including the type and condition of the surface, the temperature of the ice, and the weight and shape of the object moving across the ice.

What are the potential applications of studying ice patch friction?

The study of ice patch friction has potential applications in a variety of fields, including transportation, sports equipment design, and winter safety. By understanding how different surfaces interact with ice, we can make informed decisions to improve safety and performance in these areas.

Suggested for: Just a quick check for my solutions - ice patch friction

Back
Top