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Learning differential equations

  1. Mar 14, 2009 #1
    Hi everyone,

    First, I'll apologize if this is posted in the wrong forum; I couldn't see any more fitting categories.

    Secondly, I just wanted to introduce myself. I've been a member for a little over a year, but haven't contributed since I didn't think I had anything useful to contribute academic wise; now that I've finished my first year of engineering, I can help answer some of the more basic calculus questions.

    My main question is this: next year I am being thrown head first into four courses all dealing with DEs (in all forms) and maxwell's equations. What is the best way to learn/prepare for differential equations? I understand that they present a very solid foundation for later courses so they're very important.

    Cheers!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 14, 2009 #2

    Tom Mattson

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    I would say buy the DE book now and start grinding away. I would also recommend getting the Schaum's outline entitled "Modern Introductory Differential Equations". It has many problems with detailed solutions, and even more problems with just the answers.
     
  4. Mar 14, 2009 #3
    Great! Thanks for the quick response. I'll see if I can find a copy of Schaums somewhere. Do you happen to know if that covers PDEs as well?
     
  5. Mar 14, 2009 #4

    Tom Mattson

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    It doesn't but there's another Schaum's outline entitled "Partial Differential Equations". I have them both, and I like them. If you want an honest-to-goodness textbook on PDE's I would recommend Strauss. It's the one I was taught from, and I really liked it.
     
  6. Mar 14, 2009 #5
    Another good one to look at might be "Ordinary Differential Equations" by Pollard and Tenenbaum. Lots of problems, and quite comprehensive. (And it's a Dover, so it's pretty cheap.)
     
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