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Looking for equations

  1. Feb 11, 2005 #1

    Nim

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    Does anyone know where I can find a website or know of a book with a comprehensive list of equations? I want to know what they do, what units they use, etc... Some sort of reference you know?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 11, 2005 #2

    honestrosewater

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    equations for what?
     
  4. Feb 11, 2005 #3

    dextercioby

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    Tell me if you don't like this site
    www.mathworld.com

    It's got almost everything.

    Daniel.
     
  5. Feb 11, 2005 #4

    mathwonk

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    come on. what kind of question is that? a list of all the equations in the world?

    thats like asking for a list of all the recipes in the world, or all the sentences in the world. or all the proverbs in the world, only far, farrrrrrr, more impossible.

    think about your question a teeny bit more.
     
  6. Feb 11, 2005 #5

    Zurtex

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    Would you like them all in lexical order with relivance to every different subject in the world? :rolleyes:
     
  7. Feb 11, 2005 #6

    Nim

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    It doesn't have to be all of them, just a lot. Doesn't matter what kind of equations either. Im mostly spending my time looking for ones that deal with physics. Sorry for not being clear enough.
     
  8. Feb 11, 2005 #7

    dextercioby

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    Which branch of physics...?I doubt u'll find a book with such equations,just for your astoundment and admiration...

    Daniel.
     
  9. Feb 11, 2005 #8

    Nim

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    This site is a lot of help. I didn't find a category about equations, but I did a search and got a lot of results. At the moment Im trying to get a list of the basic science equations.

    Code (Text):

    E=M*c²         Energy=DynamicMass*SpeedOfLight²       Joules=Kilograms*Meters Per Second
    E=m/sqrt(1-v²/c²)*c² Energy=Mass/sqrt(1-Velocity²*SoL²)*SoL²         ???
    M=m/sqrt(1-v²/c²)*c² DynamicM=Mass/sqrt(1-Velocity²*SoL²)*SoL²    ???
    KE=0.5*m*v²        Energy=0.5*mass*velocity²          Joules=0.5*Kilograms*Meters Per Second
    KE=P*t          Energy=Power*Time                       Joules=Watts*Seconds
    KE=V*I*t        Energy=Voltage*Current*Time             Joules=Volts*Amps*Seconds
    PE=M*C²            Energy=Mass*Speed of Light²                Joules=Kilograms*Meters Per Second
    PE=h*f          Energy=Planck's Constant*Frequency      Joules=???*Hertz
    PE=m*g*h        Energy=mass*acceleration of gravity*height  ???
    P=E/t           Power=Energy/Time                   Watts=Joules*Seconds
    P=V*I           Power=Voltage*Current                   Watts=Volts*Amps
    P=I²*R         Power=Current²*Resistance          Watts=Amps²*Ohms
    P=V²/R         Power=Voltage²/Resistance          Watts=Volts²/Ohms
    I=P/V           Current=Power/Voltage                   Amps=Watts/Volts
    I=V/R           Current=Voltage/Resistance          Amps=Volts/Ohms (Ohm's Law)
    V=P/I           Voltage=Power/Current                   Volts=Watts/Amps
    V=I*R           Voltage=Current*Resistance          Volts=Amps*Ohms
    R=P/I²         Resistance=Power/Current²          Ohms=Watts/Amps²
    R=V²/P         Resistance=Voltage²/Power          Ohms=Volts²/Watts
    R=V/I           Resistance=Voltage/Current          Ohms=Volts/Amps
    Q=I*t           Charge=Current*Time                 Coulombs=Amps*Seconds
    D=S*T           DistanceTraveled=Speed*ElapsedTime      Kilometers=Kilometers Per Second*Seconds
    S=D/T           Speed=DistanceTraveled/ElapsedTime      Kilometers Per Second=Kilometers/Seconds
    T=D/S           ElapsedTime=DistanceTraveled/Speed      Seconds=Kilometers/Kilometers Per Second
    c=n*l           WaveVelocity=Frequency*Wavelength       Meters Per Second=Hertz*Meters
    l=c/n           Wavelength=WaveVelocity/Frequency       Meters=Meters Per Second/Hertz
    n=c/l           Frequency=WaveVelocity/Wavelength       Hertz=Meters Per Second/Meters
     
     
  10. Feb 11, 2005 #9

    mathwonk

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    look. if you want to understand physics, do not concern yourself with a huge pile of equations. learn the most important ideas. I have it on good authority, that these are the conservation laws.

    more knowledgable input anyone?
     
  11. Feb 11, 2005 #10

    dextercioby

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    First of all i resent the idea of gathering a pile of equations from all areas of (in this case classical) physics which have nothing in common and whose relevance is totally lost.Basically u jump with ease from equations/equalities in SR to nonrelativistic mechanics and then to elecrticity.It's pointless.
    As for units,they are totally mixed up.U can't have both meters & Kilometers,u can have only one species...
    Plus the notation is totally unappropriate and would definitely generate confusion...

    Daniel.
     
  12. Feb 11, 2005 #11

    Nim

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    It's for a program that Im working on. If you type in an equation it looks at it and cuts it up in pieces and takes the parts that looks like a value needs to be added too and puts it next to a texbox. Once I have a lot of equations, Im going to add a search feature so its easier to find an equation for a certain task. I also want to add a description of each equation eventually.
     
  13. Feb 11, 2005 #12

    Zurtex

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    :uhh:

    There are many reasons why I think you'll struggle with that, but good luck, remember though equations without context are meaningless as anyone can write down a random equation.
     
  14. Feb 11, 2005 #13

    dextercioby

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    In that case,i assume u won't be needing our help,we're not encyclopedias of equations...

    Daniel.
     
  15. Feb 11, 2005 #14

    Nim

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    Of course not, I was hoping that you might know of some books or websites that were though.

    But since that doesn't seem to possible, and since I seem to be confused about some things like unappropriate notation and the use of measurements, maybe you can point me out to a site that can tell me how to do these things right?
     
  16. Feb 11, 2005 #15

    dextercioby

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  17. Feb 12, 2005 #16

    honestrosewater

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  18. Feb 12, 2005 #17
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