Low Heat/Thermal Conductivity Electric Conductive Materials

In summary, the conversation discusses electric conductive materials with low thermal conductivity and high electrical conductivity for various applications, such as thermoelectric cooling and cryogenic applications. Some possible materials mentioned include stainless steel, multi-layer laminate, superconducting materials like NbTiN, and alloys like copper-beryllium and copper-nickel. These materials are chosen for their ability to reduce electrical resistance and minimize heat transfer.
  • #1
abdulbadii
43
1
TL;DR Summary
What is an electric conductive material which is the least heat/thermal conductive?
What is/are the electric conductive material(s) which has/have the least heat/thermal conductive?
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
What materials have you looked at so far? What is the application? Will this be a thin film, a solid wire or bus bar, or a liquid maybe? The more details you can give, the better we will be able to help you.
 
  • Like
Likes Baluncore
  • #3
abdulbadii said:
What is/are the electric conductive material(s) which has/have the least heat/thermal conductive?
Some stainless steel alloys used for cookware or kettles may surprise you. The polished surface, and the internal grain structure, can be used to advantage.

If the low thermal conduction, and the high electrical conduction, can be arranged to be perpendicular, then consider a multi-layer laminate.

What is the application ?
 
  • Like
Likes abdulbadii
  • #4
Try searching thermoelectric cooling. From one of the hits:

Requirements for thermoelectric materials:
High electrical conductivity (to reduce electrical resistance, a source of waste heat);
Low thermal conductivity (so that heat doesn't come back from the hot side to the cool side); this usually translates to heavy elements


Sounds like what you are looking for.
 
  • Like
Likes Lord Jestocost
  • #5
Superconducting materials (both conventional and HTS), this is what is used in cryogenic applications. E.g. NbTiN is used both for DC and RF applications and that the electrical losses are very low is of course a bonus.

As has already been mentioned stainless steal is also an option, but might be a bit too lossy for many applications.
Generally speaking, alloys have lower thermal conductivity than "pure" metals and are therefore often used. copper-beryllium and copper-nickel would be two widely used examples.
 
  • Like
Likes abdulbadii

Similar threads

Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
384
Replies
1
Views
563
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
5
Views
220
  • General Engineering
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
17
Views
566
  • General Engineering
2
Replies
67
Views
4K
Replies
7
Views
302
Back
Top