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Magnetic Gloves for scaling skyscrapers

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  1. Feb 23, 2015 #1
    Hi!

    I was wondering how I would go about solving a problem like this: (I have experience with up to multi-variable calculus and moderate level physics)

    So I'm trying to see if it's plausible to create electromagnets, which fit into gloves and/or boots, that would allow a person to climb around a metal building like a bug. I'm assuming your entire system (body and gear) weighs 100 kg for the sake of this problem. I've managed to figure out that to stay connected to the building you'll need the magnet to apply a force of about 6533.3 N to the building you're on. My question is, how do I calculate, under reasonable assumptions made about the design of such items (fits in the hand, no area as large as 10 m^2 for example) the electrical requirements for such a feat (voltages, current, etc.)

    Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 24, 2015 #2

    billy_joule

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    That seems like a large force, what did you use for the coefficient of friction?
     
  4. Feb 24, 2015 #3
    Iron to iron under less-than-optimal conditions, or 0.15
     
  5. Feb 24, 2015 #4

    billy_joule

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    I would recommend a thin layer of rubber over your magnet...
     
  6. Feb 24, 2015 #5

    Baluncore

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    Why use electromagnets? You could use PMs with sliding pole pieces that enable or disable the external field.
    Check out magnetic chucks. http://www.themagnetguide.com/magnetic-chuck.html

    Rubber is OK when it is dry. Water is a natural lubricant for rubber. Something like thin cigarette paper can be glued to the face of the magnet. It then works when wet or dry.
     
  7. Feb 24, 2015 #6

    billy_joule

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    Rice papers tear at the very mention of water IME - long time roll your own smoker
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 24, 2015
  8. Feb 24, 2015 #7

    Baluncore

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    The behaviour of a material is dependent on how it is supported. When thin paper is glued to a clean chuck, the fibres attach to the chuck and not to each other. When machining “slippery” metal held in a steel chuck, a cigarette paper which is cheap, thin, and has accurate dimensions, increases friction. There are many different types of paper available.
     
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