Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Magnetic powder question

  1. Dec 3, 2014 #1
    Does any kind of magnetic powder exist?
    I mean not iron powder, that is attracted to a magnet but vice versa, a type of powder, that when i take an iron nail or screw and get it close to that powder, the powder will attach itself to that iron object and stay there, for as long as it is not taken off.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 3, 2014 #2
    If there was, what would keep it from sticking together in a lump?
     
  4. Dec 3, 2014 #3
    Great answer. But if I were to isolate a single powder particle, then it should also exist as a dipole.
     
  5. Dec 3, 2014 #4
    If you found a particle that wasn't a dipole, you'd be famous.
     
  6. Dec 3, 2014 #5
    M
    Magnetic monopoles do not exist.
     
  7. Dec 3, 2014 #6

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    You realize that iron filings can be magnetized, I hope. And yes, they do clump up in a blob when individual filings are put close to one another.

    You can also add these filings to Silly Putty and mix the two up. It makes a cool magnet-hungry blob, as seen in the video at the attached article:

    http://science.wonderhowto.com/insp...tty-into-freakish-magnet-hungry-blob-0128239/
     
  8. Dec 3, 2014 #7
    QED theory suggests that they should exist. Just because they haven't been found does not prove they do not exist.
     
  9. Dec 3, 2014 #8
    I debated on mentioning this, almost any magnetic material will retain a residual magnetic charge when removed from a strong field.
    I'm curious what would happen around a DC current flow.
     
  10. Dec 3, 2014 #9
    Let me rephrase the question:
    Does there exist any kind of liquid-glue that can dry, which after drying has a permanent magnetic field?
     
  11. Dec 3, 2014 #10

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    IDK what drying has to do with producing a magnetic field. It seems to me if you can put magnetic powder in Silly Putty, you can do the same with a pot of glue.
     
  12. Dec 3, 2014 #11
    Yes,
    But as much as i understood, the magnetic putty has no self magnetic field, it reacts to the magnetic field of a magnet. i am looking for such a kind of putty or rather drying color, which has a measurable self magnetic field after drying. Not the kind of liquid matter that relies on a magnet to react, but liquid-plastic drying matter which has its own magnetic field.
     
  13. Dec 3, 2014 #12

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I'm not sure what you are trying to say here.

    The Silly Putty in the video demonstration was magnetic due to the powder mixed in it. A bunch of tiny little magnets can create a magnetic field, just not with the same field strength distribution as a big bar magnet can, for example.
     
  14. Dec 3, 2014 #13
    If i take a ferromagnetic powder, such as in the following link and a Hall effect sensor and spread a few grams of the powder, as in drawing with sand on the table, will the Hall effect sensor be able to detect the powder lines?
    If the answer is NO, does there exist such a powder or such a plastic-liquid, that does have such properties?
    If the answer is YES, is it still yes, if i mix the powder at a certain ratio, with some sort of plastic-liquid?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/261141008974?_trksid=p2060778.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2014
  15. Dec 3, 2014 #14

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Beats me. Why don't you get some magnetite powder and do an experiment?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Magnetic powder question
  1. A Magnetic Question (Replies: 6)

  2. Magnetism Question (Replies: 1)

  3. Question on Magnets (Replies: 2)

Loading...