Master civil/structural engineering looking to work for Boeing.

In summary, it is important to have a degree in civil engineering if you want to work as a structural engineer for Boeing. However, a second masters in aerospace may not be a good investment of your time, as your chances of getting hired may not be significantly improved. It is also not an either-or choice, as you can always work on getting the job while simultaneously applying to an aerospace program.
  • #1
vtn
3
0
Your input is much appreciated, thank you in advance.

I am currently a graduate student studying structural engineering in the civil engineering department. I am looking to work for Boeing as a structural engineer. I have been taking some aerospace classes such as continuum mechanics, solids of mechanics, and will take six more classes (such as mechanics of composites, finite element analysis, fracture mechanics) in both the aerospace and mechanical department even though I will not need it for graduation.

Basically, would a master degree in civil, instead of mechanical or aerospace hurt my chances? Would my chance improve significantly if I continue on to get a second masters in aerospace (say focusing on structural)? Or would that not be a good investment of my time.

Thanks again, hope to hear what you might have to say.
 
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  • #2
Why don't you change majors?
 
  • #3
comp_math said:
Why don't you change majors?
You don't quite change majors in graduate school, but transferring between programs might not be a terrible idea. It sounds like it's definitely worth asking at least.

I can't speak on behalf of Boeing, but you'll probably have to do some legwork to be considered at all from civil. You almost certainly won't get past the online application filter or HR drones, so your only shot is probably networking. After that, it all depends on the influence of the people you get through to and their personal prejudices about the degree. I could be wrong though - maybe they take structural people from civil all the time.

It's also not an either-or choice if you can't transfer. You can always work on getting the job while simultaneously applying to an aerospace program, if that's really what you want to be doing. I recommend applying to their competitors too and doing some research about similar companies (or industries) and jobs. Getting any job always includes some degree of luck, so its best to stay informed and keep your options open.
 
  • #4
Taking classes in mechanics, continuum mechanics, and finite element methods is certainly helpful, but it may not be enough. It may be better also for you to know something about aircraft structures. You might also want to consider taking a course in fluid dynamics and how it relates to aircraft structures. There are other things like aeroelasticity and CFD, which you may need to know. My point is relevance - if you want to go into the aerospace industry, it is probably better to do mechanical or aerospace engineering directly.


kote said:
You don't quite change majors in graduate school, but transferring between programs might not be a terrible idea. It sounds like it's definitely worth asking at least.

I can't speak on behalf of Boeing, but you'll probably have to do some legwork to be considered at all from civil. You almost certainly won't get past the online application filter or HR drones, so your only shot is probably networking. After that, it all depends on the influence of the people you get through to and their personal prejudices about the degree. I could be wrong though - maybe they take structural people from civil all the time.

It's also not an either-or choice if you can't transfer. You can always work on getting the job while simultaneously applying to an aerospace program, if that's really what you want to be doing. I recommend applying to their competitors too and doing some research about similar companies (or industries) and jobs. Getting any job always includes some degree of luck, so its best to stay informed and keep your options open.
 
  • #5
Thank you very much everyone. Actually I wa planning on taking fluid dynamics and CFD courses in the near future.

Would you mind, how does the job market look like in the distant future? I have ponder it often whether getting a second master in aerospace would be of a financial risk.

Your thoughts are helpful, and I really do appreciate it. Thanks.
 
  • #6
Don't need to worry on things you have no control over, seriously. There will always be jobs for well-qualified people, in whatever field.
 

Related to Master civil/structural engineering looking to work for Boeing.

1. What are the main responsibilities of a civil/structural engineer at Boeing?

A civil/structural engineer at Boeing is responsible for designing and analyzing the structural components of aircrafts and other aerospace products. This includes evaluating the strength and stability of materials, developing structural designs, and ensuring compliance with safety regulations.

2. What skills are necessary to become a successful civil/structural engineer at Boeing?

Some of the key skills needed for success in this role include a strong understanding of structural analysis and design principles, proficiency in computer-aided design (CAD) software, and the ability to work well in a team environment. Additionally, attention to detail, problem-solving skills, and a strong knowledge of engineering mathematics are also important.

3. What types of projects do civil/structural engineers at Boeing typically work on?

Civil/structural engineers at Boeing may work on a variety of projects, including the design and development of new aircraft models, modifications to existing aircraft structures, and testing and analysis of structural components. They may also be involved in research and development efforts to improve aircraft performance and safety.

4. What educational background is needed to pursue a career as a civil/structural engineer at Boeing?

Typically, a bachelor's degree in civil or structural engineering is required to work at Boeing. Some positions may also require a master's degree or additional specialized training in areas such as aerospace engineering or materials science. It is also important to have a strong academic background in subjects such as mathematics, physics, and computer science.

5. How does Boeing support the professional development of its civil/structural engineers?

Boeing offers a variety of opportunities for professional development and career growth for its civil/structural engineers. This may include on-the-job training, mentorship programs, and access to continuing education and training courses. Additionally, the company encourages employees to pursue certifications and licenses to further develop their skills and knowledge.

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