Mathematics Grad School Prep. (1 Viewer)

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Hello everyone, i have a couple of questions:

1-What are the General basic admission requirements for top Grad schools in Mathematics?
2-As an undergraduate how do i prepare for Math grad school?
(I am not allowed to take grad courses at my school, There are no high-level summer math courses, should i do independant reaserch?)

Btw I am a freshman,

Any advice would be highly appreciated!
 
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Hello everyone, i have a couple of questions:

1-What are the General basic admission requirements for top Grad schools in Mathematics?
2-As an undergraduate how do i prepare for Math grad school?
(I am not allowed to take grad courses at my school, There are no high-level summer math courses, should i do independant reaserch?)

Btw I am a freshman,

Any advice would be highly appreciated!
There are many threads answering these exact questions. But to answer your question about what to do in the summer; yes, try to get involved in research. An REU is a good goal.
 
I'm sure that if you ask your school after doing very well in undergraduate mathematics, your school *should* allow you to take grad. classes in math. To improve your chances, you should try to do very well in the most advanced undergrad. math classes they have as early as possible. If you can do this by the end of your second year (preferably), or by the end of your third year (more likely), you're in good position.

Research: I'm not exactly sure whether it's worth doing research as a freshman. You should try by all means, but it's probably better if you try to absorb some more mathematics. Also choose your field carefully. It's easier to do research in something like numerical analysis, rather than algebraic geometry, for example. And don't be discouraged if you don't get results immediately. It's rare for freshmen to have research published (but it does sometimes happen). Quality is the most important. Getting small results is very helpful, but you shouldn't discount the possibility of getting major breakthroughs. The latter is more likely if you have a greater set of tools at your disposal.
 
I'm sure that if you ask your school after doing very well in undergraduate mathematics, your school *should* allow you to take grad. classes in math. To improve your chances, you should try to do very well in the most advanced undergrad. math classes they have as early as possible. If you can do this by the end of your second year (preferably), or by the end of your third year (more likely), you're in good position.

Research: I'm not exactly sure whether it's worth doing research as a freshman. You should try by all means, but it's probably better if you try to absorb some more mathematics. Also choose your field carefully. It's easier to do research in something like numerical analysis, rather than algebraic geometry, for example. And don't be discouraged if you don't get results immediately. It's rare for freshmen to have research published (but it does sometimes happen). Quality is the most important. Getting small results is very helpful, but you shouldn't discount the possibility of getting major breakthroughs. The latter is more likely if you have a greater set of tools at your disposal.

Thank you so much for the wondeful reply!,
 

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