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Maximum voltage for breadboards?

  1. Sep 14, 2010 #1
    Anyone know what the maximum voltage you should put to a breadboard is? I've got a project that I need to prototype but it involves voltages of around 100V. I have a couple fairly high quality breadboards, do you think this is safe?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 14, 2010 #2
    From Wikipedia:
    If you have high quality breaboards, you may want to check the manufacturers' specs for those boards.
     
  4. Sep 14, 2010 #3
    I already tried. Most manufactures have no such specs including the ones that manufactured my boards.
     
  5. Sep 14, 2010 #4
    Are you pushing 100V DC? How many amps are you running? I think there's two issues here: The wattage the breadboard can handle, and the contact insulation.
     
  6. Sep 14, 2010 #5
    Yes, 100V DC. I'm pushing about 100uA max.
     
  7. Sep 14, 2010 #6
    Hmm. You can try it. According to one response on Yahoo Q&A that I saw, a guy successfully tested a 110V AC circuit on a breadboard, with low current. Give it a try with non-critical components?
     
  8. Sep 14, 2010 #7
    It will work.
     
  9. Sep 14, 2010 #8

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Is this a plated through hole per pad type of breadboard? Can you post a link to what it looks like?

    Plated through 0.1" breadboards are meant to be used with SELV voltages, which is basically 60V and below (although the specs vary...). If you can remove interstitial pads/holes/metal to create a wider spacing between energized pads, that would be the best approach.

    What is it for? Are you following safe practices in the project (UL safety-type specs regarding fusing, creepage and clearance specs, user access to non-SELV voltages, etc.)?
     
  10. Sep 14, 2010 #9
    I've used breadboards for 170 V with currents in the hundreds of microamps. But you should definitely use caution if you decide to try it.
     
  11. Sep 14, 2010 #10

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Do you mean the white plastic plugboards, or FR4 plated pad per hole soldered breadboards? Did you have 170V directly between adjacent holes?
     
  12. Sep 14, 2010 #11
    The white plastic plugboards, I gave it a generous spacing. I should also mention that I only ran it for five minutes or less at a time.
     
  13. Sep 14, 2010 #12
    I've had a small high voltage transformer hooked up directly on the breadboard and following a diode voltage doubler at ~700V. No problems there.
     
  14. Sep 14, 2010 #13
    Its the white plug solderless type breadboards that are made of a thermoset kind of plastic.

    This kind of device:

    n:ANd9GcT8K2A4-gj9wn8zrazLQGP8yTOUnV8axq_XfiXfQpiPHF67oKM&t=1&usg=__DvwI0sI5GTxSEFHY3zDXJ5lykGw=.jpg
     
  15. Sep 14, 2010 #14
    I think I'm gonna give it a shot. I'll just keep the pins a few spaces apart and I think it should be alright. I won't ever be putting more than 10mW through the board so I doubt anything's going to melt. As long as nothing arcs it should be fine I would think.

    I wish I was half the man you are. I start to get squeamish with anything over 240V and I wouldn't even dare working with stuff like that on a breadboard.
     
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