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May a layman post a scientific manuscript in arXiv?

  1. Jul 2, 2015 #1
    May a layman post a scientific manuscript (regarding cosmology) in "arXiv"? Will it be properly reviewed? Thank you, if you know the answer.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 2, 2015 #2

    PeterDonis

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  4. Jul 2, 2015 #3
    Peter, I am already aware of this link. Thx. I wish to know, from anyone with experience, if a layman, unaffiliated with a University, has a reasonable chance of review and assessment. Sorry, for the confusion.
     
  5. Jul 2, 2015 #4

    PeterDonis

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    I would say the best way to find that out is to contact the people that run arxiv. Note that arxiv itself does not do "review and assessment"; they just host submitted content. Whether what you post there gets any review and assessment depends on who else wants to read it.
     
  6. Jul 2, 2015 #5

    Orodruin

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    In addition to what Peter said, if you are not a member of a trusted academic institution, you may need endorsement from a person in the field. This is how far the arXiv review process goes. If you want your paper reviewed, you should instead submit it to a scientific journal.
     
  7. Jul 2, 2015 #6

    Dale

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    No. arXiv does not review articles. That is one reason that sources on arXiv are often not considered valid sources here at PF.
     
  8. Jul 2, 2015 #7
    You need someone that has already published in arXiv to sponsor you.
     
  9. Jul 2, 2015 #8

    jtbell

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    See here for their endorsement system:

    http://arxiv.org/help/endorsement
     
  10. Jul 2, 2015 #9

    StatGuy2000

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    My understanding is the arXiv does not review articles, per se, but functions more as a pre-print service so that those technical reports that are pre-publication can see the light of day. Many researchers in various fields (e.g math, physics, statistics, theoretical computer science, etc.) often post their articles in arXiv in this manner. Would these technical reports not be considered valid sources, if they are intended to be submitted for peer review?
     
  11. Jul 2, 2015 #10

    e.bar.goum

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    Broadly speaking, whether or not a pre-print is a valid source depends on the field. In most places in physics, it's acceptable to cite an arXiv pre-print until it is published, and then you'd cite the published paper. Obviously, whether or not to cite a particular article depends on whether or not the author thinks the paper is relevant/interesting/correct. Junk on the arXiv or junk in Physical Review Letters is still junk, you know?

    ETA: The above isn't about PFs rules, but what you see in professional physics.
     
  12. Jul 2, 2015 #11

    Dale

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    The rules require that topics must "be found in textbooks or that have been published in reputable journals." If an arXiv source is consistent with textbooks or reputable journals then it is fine, but "intended to be submitted for peer review" is not in itself a sufficient qualification for something that is outside the mainstream.
     
  13. Jul 3, 2015 #12

    Orodruin

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    Adding to what Dale said: A paper being intended for submission to peer review is not the same as being peer reviewed. That is why journals have peer review, to make sure (ehr, well ... try to make sure) that the journal upholds a certain scientific standard. There is of course no guarantee (and there should not be) that a peer reviewed pper will be accepted.
     
  14. Jul 4, 2015 #13
    It may be easier for a layman to get an endorsement in Popular Physics (category) than in Cosmology. Have you sent your paper to some qualified endorsers in Cosmology?
     
  15. Jul 5, 2015 #14

    mfb

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    Finding an endorser is much easier than writing a cosmology article of any value - especially if the latter has been achieved already.
     
  16. Jul 5, 2015 #15

    Vanadium 50

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    Also, I don't think it is the job of endorsers to read random manuscripts from people they don't know. It's the job of endorsers to say things like "This paper is from my student, and that's why she hasn't submitted before."
     
  17. Jul 5, 2015 #16
    That's certainly one approach laid out in arXiv's description of its endorsement system. But the description certainly offers alternatives for authors entering new fields where they may not be a student. See: http://arxiv.org/help/endorsement

    I was well beyond grad school when I posted my first arXiv paper in atomic physics, so I solicited an endorsement from someone I didn't know. I've also published peer-reviewed papers in physics education, medical physics, instrumentation and detectors, and several quantitative biology subfields. The arXiv endorsement process was easy, but required emailing a qualified endorser that I didn't know.

    As a qualified endorser for a number of fields, I get one or two emails each year asking for endorsement. In a decade, I think I've only turned down a couple which were clearly crackpot type papers which were not even worth the bandwidth. I probably get five times the number of peer-review requests from journals, funding agencies, etc. as arXiv endorsement requests. I accept almost all of them, because I see it as a scientist's duty to the scientific community to serve in this way.
     
  18. Jul 5, 2015 #17

    Orodruin

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    In many (most?) cases, this will not be necessary as the student will be a member of a trusted institute. I thought I would have to endorse my student when he submitted his first paper, but no. He had no problems.
     
  19. Jul 5, 2015 #18

    Vanadium 50

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    One thing that surprised me is how few students use their university email addresses - they seem to want to send everything to gmail. This confounds the mechanism for arXiv to know where things come from. For me, while my actual email server is 3rd party, I use my institutional email addresses for institutional stuff.
     
  20. Jul 5, 2015 #19
    Institutional email addresses are a pain. They can be inaccessible from remote locations, they make it hard for others to correspond about a paper once you move on, and odds are most scientists will have several during a career. By the time a student is posting to arXiv, s/he is most likely within a year or two of moving to another institution. Why use an email address that will soon be obsolete, sometimes by the time a paper even appears in print?
     
  21. Jul 5, 2015 #20

    Vanadium 50

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    Like I said - my institutional email is forwarded. Solves that problem. There are also Lab emails - I must have 8. Maybe 9. I think it's really more likely that it's an issue of getting their email on their phones. I solved that problem by buying an app. Cost me maybe a buck.

    But we're drifting. Do you think it's the responsbility of endorsers to review works by people unknown to him that do not have greenlighted institutional affilaitions? I don't. I get a few every year, and I send them straight to the trash. Partly because I am an experimeter and these are always theories.
     
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