Mechanical or Civil Engineering: Which Major is Right for You?

In summary, the individual is a year one engineering student struggling between choosing mechanical or civil engineering as their major. They have better skills in memorization, reporting, and physics, but struggle with math, social skills, and carelessness. They are seeking advice on which major would suit their personality better and what other factors they should consider. They have taken introductory courses but found them to be different from what they will actually do in their major. They are also wondering about the job prospects for both majors and if there are any advantages or disadvantages for girls. Both majors are ranked highly in their university, with civil engineering being more popular. The individual is also considering electrical and aerospace engineering. They have two nieces in the engineering field, one in civil
  • #1
yecko
Gold Member
279
15
hello everyone
I am a year one engineering student and soon I need to choose my major, and I am still struggling mechanical or civil engineering.

Background of me:
compared to my engineering colleagues, my memorization, reporting skills (indeed i like oral or written presentation :) ) and physics are better. however, I found my mathematical (especially calculus!) skills, my social skills (like communication with others :( )and i am careless which i am most conservative to choose both majors.

can anyone suggest which kind of personality are suitable on the majors? and what else i should evaluate on in order to choose major?

I have tried to have introductory courses last semester, but it seems they are quite different from what we are going to do after we have chosen our major, which they don't help me with understanding on the majors. like we did almost all memorization on mechanical engineering course, without any calculation or experiment, and it seems to be a geography class for civil engineering class.

anymore precise skills i need to have in order to choose the major?? ~~i KNOW the syllabus:)

moreover, do girls have more advantages or disadvantages on both majors?Background of my program:
both of majors of my uni are ranking twenty something in the world. however civil is ranking third while mechanical is ranking first in my home city.
I don't know why civil engineering is the most popular (and far more popular) subject in my university, but i don't want to just follow the trend unconsciously
regarding job prospect, civil engineering has got higher demand here but there are also far more supply in my home, can anyone tell me more on job prospect in other parts of the world as well??

Thanks for any sharing with me :)
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Both programs are good. Civil is more geared toward engineering outdoor structures, buildings, bridges, canals...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_engineering

whereas Mechanical Engineering is more geared toward machine design, robotics, mechatronics, analyzing acoustical environments and doing a lot of numerical simulations and CAD design.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanical_engineering

You can get some ideas from the wiki articles.

I have two nieces one is a civil engineer and the other a petroleum engineer both have great jobs in the oil industry.

There's also electrical engineering and Aerospace engineering to consider.

All of these majors will probably use Matlab or something similar to do much of your numerical work on so that would be something to get familiar with (there an open source version matlab-like clone called freemat that you can play with).
 
Last edited:
  • #3
The ME I work with, who is retired from Hughes Aerospace, says MEs make weapons, CEs make targets.
 
  • Like
Likes Buffu

Related to Mechanical or Civil Engineering: Which Major is Right for You?

1. Mechanical or civil?

This is a common question that many students ask when deciding on a field of study. Both mechanical and civil engineering are important branches of engineering that involve the design, construction, and maintenance of structures and systems. The main difference between the two is that mechanical engineering focuses on the design and development of mechanical systems, while civil engineering focuses on the design and construction of infrastructure and buildings. So, the answer to this question depends on your interests and career goals.

2. What is the difference between mechanical and civil engineering?

As mentioned before, mechanical engineering deals with the design, development, and maintenance of mechanical systems such as engines, machines, and tools. Civil engineering, on the other hand, focuses on the design and construction of infrastructure and buildings such as roads, bridges, and buildings. Both fields require a strong understanding of math, physics, and design principles, but the applications and industries they work in may vary.

3. Which field has better job prospects?

Both mechanical and civil engineering are in high demand and offer good job prospects. The demand for mechanical engineers is driven by the growth of industries such as automotive, aerospace, and manufacturing, while the need for civil engineers is driven by the increasing population and urbanization, which requires the construction of new infrastructure. Ultimately, the job prospects will depend on the current market conditions and your skills and experience in the field.

4. Is one field more challenging than the other?

Both mechanical and civil engineering are challenging fields that require strong problem-solving skills and attention to detail. The level of difficulty may vary depending on your strengths and interests. For example, if you enjoy designing and building machines, mechanical engineering may be more challenging for you, while if you have a passion for designing and constructing buildings, civil engineering may be more challenging.

5. Can you switch from mechanical to civil engineering or vice versa?

While both fields have their own unique set of skills and knowledge, there is some overlap between them. This means that it is possible to switch from one field to the other, but it may require additional education or training. For example, a mechanical engineer may need to take courses in structural engineering to transition into civil engineering, while a civil engineer may need to learn about thermodynamics and fluid mechanics to move into mechanical engineering. Ultimately, it is important to choose a field that aligns with your interests and goals to avoid the need for switching.

Similar threads

  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
21
Views
3K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
794
Replies
17
Views
3K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
4
Views
5K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
5
Views
2K
Back
Top