Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Microwaveable packaged meals?

  1. Jul 7, 2009 #1

    tgt

    User Avatar

    Anything wrong with those meals? Provided only the salt reduced ones and ones with other healthy labels on it are bought. Dependent only on them is bad but how about one of them each day?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 7, 2009 #2

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    It amazes me that people even consider buying pre-packaged foods and somehow think that "healthy labels" means they are healthy. I really figured that people knew these things are not that healthy, but just don't care because it's easy to prepare and people are generally lazy. I didn't really think anyone actually believed they could be healthy to eat. I guess advertising does work.
     
  4. Jul 7, 2009 #3

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Next time you are in a store, read the lists of ingredients on some packages of "Healthy Choice" and "Lean Cuisine" meals. Then ask yourself if you want to put all that crap in your body.
     
  5. Jul 7, 2009 #4
    They are better for you than ramen, but not as healthy as something that you would prepare your self from fresh vegetables and meats.
     
  6. Jul 7, 2009 #5

    chemisttree

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    There's nothing wrong with long lists of chemicals! They're soooo tasty.

    An actual ingredient list (Michael Angelo's Chicken Parmesan)

    Tomatoes (vine-ripened tomatoes, tomato puree, salt, basil)
    Water (yuck! Probably that flluoridated crap!)
    Pasta (100% Enriched Durum semolina, Niacin, thiamine, iron, folic acid, riboflavin)
    Chicken breast
    Mozzarella cheese (Pasturized milk, cheese culture, salt, enzymes)
    Cracker crumbs (Wheat flour, garlic powder, Parmesan and Romano cheese (part skim cow's milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes) salt, spices, parsley(this confirms that parsley is not a spice), dextrose),
    Soy oil
    Onions
    Egg
    Imported Parmesan cheese (milk, salt natural lactic cultures, rennet)
    Wheat flour (unbleached enriched, malted barley flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid)
    Olive oil
    Spices
    Salt
    Garlic
    Garlic powder
    Sugar
    Fresh parsley

    I dare you to show me the chemicals on that list...

    And, yes I do want to put all that crap into my body (with the possible exception of the fluoride-poisoned water).
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2009
  7. Jul 7, 2009 #6
    Well Michael Angelo's brand is relatively expensive. There are a few 'Organic' label brands that are relatively expensive aswell.
     
  8. Jul 7, 2009 #7
    Don't you know that Dihydrogen Oxide is incredibly bad for you? It only takes a single tablespoon of the stuff to kill you! I would never eat anything that has that poison in it.

    http://www.dhmo.org/facts.html
     
  9. Jul 7, 2009 #8

    Pengwuino

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I hope you don't fill your childs stomach with crap like that as well! Disgusting.
     
  10. Jul 7, 2009 #9

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    And whats wrong with Ramen - they are a major part of the international jet set lifestyle of airline pilots (as well as grad students)

    http://images.salon.com/tech/col/smith/2007/01/19/askthepilot217/story.jpg

    For more on the essentials carried by airline pilots and instructions on the best way of cooking Ramen in a hotel coffee machine http://www.salon.com/tech/col/smith/2007/01/19/askthepilot217/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  11. Jul 7, 2009 #10

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    "Organic", "Healthy", "Low-fat", "Low-sodium" etc are slathered all over the labels of these processed foods. Read a bit more closely, and see how many times "high-fructose corn syrup", "modified food starch", "autolyzed yeast", "spice extract", etc show up. Also, salt is often mentioned several times in connection with the main ingredients, sauces, etc. I don't ever remember my mother or grandmother reaching for "high-fructose corn syrup" or "autolyzed yeast" when making meals for our family.

    How hard is it to make simple dishes and freeze up portions to take for lunch? If you are a student living in a dorm, there could be difficulties, but if you have an apartment with a kitchenette, it's pretty easy to make salads, rice, beans, potatoes, vegetables, etc. It's not that tough to buy some decent bread (if you don't like baking) and team that up with some cheese, apples, mustard, etc for a nice light lunch.
     
  12. Jul 7, 2009 #11

    tgt

    User Avatar

    The main problem lies in myself eating too much when I cook. Hence it would be really hard to freeze portions because I'll probably eat it all in one go. Anyone else have this difficulty?
     
  13. Jul 7, 2009 #12

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    When I was in college, I would plan my meals a week at a time, and make big batches of baked beans, lentil soup, spaghetti, whole-wheat bread, stews, etc, with the intent of making meals of the hot stuff for breakfast and supper, with light lunches of sandwiches, fruit, cheese that I could lug in a back-pack. It's not hard to do, once you get the hang of it, and the light, cold lunch was really handy. I attended college before microwaves were available, so there was a bit of a wrinkle that you won't have to deal with.
     
  14. Jul 7, 2009 #13
    I tried that once, but I couldn't help from just eating the whole week's supply in the first 2 days. I made some good food for a while, though :)
     
  15. Jul 7, 2009 #14

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Hmmmm... Munchies?

    If you plan your meals and size them appropriately so that you don't get ravenous during the day, you should be able to control food-intake. You may be able to reduce intake by substituting foods that are satisfying (crunchy, good mouth-feel, etc) in some sensory metrics. Carrots are really cheap, crunchy, and full of fiber and vitamins. Celery is a bit more expensive, but still a nice low-cal snack. In season, Bing cherries, apples, and other fruits can be great snacks or even lunches. You don't have to have a hot meal 3x/day, or even a large meal. In college, I used to hunt down an immigrant whose parents were bakers, and buy a nice round loaf of bread every few days, until I decided to start baking my own. If you didn't track him down before about 10am, he'd be sold out. The bread was that good.
     
  16. Jul 7, 2009 #15

    tgt

    User Avatar

    Exactly my problem. The hardest was right after cooking it when the portions are still warm. There is so much temptations to eat them now rather then save them for later.
     
  17. Jul 7, 2009 #16

    Math Is Hard

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Same here. If I make a skillet of spaghetti I'll snarf down half of it right after it's done. Then the next day the cold leftovers don't look so good because I gorged on spaghetti the night before. Then the day after that, they are starting to look pretty old.. a week goes by.. never gets eaten.
     
  18. Jul 7, 2009 #17

    tgt

    User Avatar

    How have you tried to solve this problem?
     
  19. Jul 7, 2009 #18

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    The solution is already stated. Eat it all while it's hot. Are you not paying attention? :rofl:
     
  20. Jul 7, 2009 #19

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Actually, freezing portions helps with controlling what you eat. It's the premise of most of those expensive diet plans that make you eat their food.

    The best way to do it is not to just package up the leftovers from dinner (you can do that too, but if you wait for leftovers, you're more prone to overeat when the food is fresh). Instead, spend an afternoon cooking when it's NOT a meal time, and with the purpose of making your own single-serving meals. Cook up the food, put it in containers and straight to the freezer. Save one serving of something for dinner. Those TV dinners sold in the freezer section are really very expensive for what is in them.

    I was thinking of something other than TV dinners, though, when you described "microwaveable packaged meals," though. SOME of the frozen TV dinners aren't that bad in terms of ingredients. Usually the big hazard is the sodium or fat content, not so much strange chemicals in the frozen ones. There are things in the canned food section that can be microwaved too, and they tend to have a lot more preservatives in them.

    Think about what most TV dinners contain, though. Some sort of meat, like turkey, or chicken, or ground beef (salisbury steak or meatloaf), plus a fairly sugary vegetable like corn or peas, and mashed potatoes. You could roast up a chicken or meatloaf on the weekend, get a bag of frozen vegetables for the week (better to buy fresh, but frozen is okay if you don't find what you want in fresh), and make a big batch of mashed potatoes. Frozen vegetables with a little water added cook up quickly in a microwave, then just reheat the meat and potatoes. You know exactly how much butter or salt you've added that way. When you cook up your meat and potatoes, you can divide it right away into single meal containers. If you're a little hungrier one night, make some extra vegetable.
     
  21. Jul 7, 2009 #20

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Good advice, MB. I would add that whenever you are feeling a bit "snacky" at home, you should not resort to a meal or a meal-sized portion of whatever you have kicking around. That way lies obesity. Instead, haul out some low-fat crackers, fruit, etc, and snack a bit (with no set portions) and STOP eating immediately when you are no longer really hungry. You will be sated a bit later, so try to anticipate this by relaxing and stopping before you are "full". Humans are genetically omnivores who are "hunter-gatherers". Who here thinks that early humans gorged themselves and went to bed full every night?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Microwaveable packaged meals?
  1. Favorite meal (Replies: 21)

  2. Vegetarian meals (Replies: 166)

  3. Enjoy your meal (Replies: 21)

  4. Meals out (Replies: 26)

Loading...