More than 3-phase system possible?

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In summary, higher phase numbers than three have been used in certain situations, such as rectifier installations and HVDC converters. This is done to reduce harmonic generation and provide smoother direct current. Experimental transmission lines have also been built with up to 12 phases, allowing for increased power transfer. Both six-phase and twelve-phase systems are utilized in some large DC converters, using either delta-wye or zig-zag transformers for phase displacement.
  • #1
samieee
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hi all,

Since there 1-phase,2-phase and 3-phase system is existing.Is it possible to have system more than 3-phases(theoretically and practically)?

I think it is possible,is my opinion correct?
 
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  • #2
Yes.

Higher phase numbers than three have been used. A common practice for rectifier installations and in HVDC converters is to provide six phases, with 60 degree phase spacing, to reduce harmonic generation in the AC supply system and to provide smoother direct current. Experimental high-phase-order transmission lines have been built with up to 12 phases. These allow application of Extra High Voltage (EHV) design rules at lower voltages, and would permit increased power transfer in the same transmission line corridor width.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphase_system#Higher_phase_order"
 
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  • #3
both six-phase and twelve-phase systems are not unheard of, and are utilized in some very large DC converters. Six-phase converters may use a delta-wye transformer, which provides 30 degrees of phase displacement. Zig-zag transformers provide 90 degrees phase displacment.
 

1. Is it possible to have a more than 3-phase system?

Yes, it is possible to have a more than 3-phase system. In fact, there are systems with 4, 5, 6, and even up to 12 phases.

2. What are the advantages of having more than 3 phases in a system?

Having more than 3 phases allows for a more balanced distribution of power, which results in lower transmission losses and increased efficiency. It also allows for the use of smaller and more cost-effective equipment.

3. How do you determine the number of phases needed in a system?

The number of phases needed in a system depends on various factors such as the amount of power required, the distance of transmission, and the type of load. A thorough analysis of these factors is needed to determine the optimal number of phases for a specific system.

4. Are there any limitations to having a more than 3-phase system?

One limitation is that the equipment and infrastructure needed for a more than 3-phase system can be more complex and expensive. Additionally, the higher number of phases may also require stricter power quality control measures.

5. Can a more than 3-phase system be used in residential areas?

It is possible to use a more than 3-phase system in residential areas, but it is not common. These systems are typically used in industrial or commercial settings where higher power demands are required. In residential areas, the standard is a 3-phase system.

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