• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products Here!

Multiple Choice problem (internal energy)

  • Thread starter cathole
  • Start date
  • #1
9
0
What must be true for two objects of the same material to have the same internal energies?
(Choose all that apply)

a. The masses of both objects must be equal

b. Both objects must have the same density

c. The temperatures of both objects must be equal

d. Separate objects cannot have identical internal energies

I guessed a,b,c and was wrong. I am thinking only a &b. Please tell me what you think.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Dick
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,258
618
You aren't saying why you think any of those are true. Guessing may be the wrong strategy. How would you calculate internal energy of a system given temperature and masses of the component objects, assuming it's an ideal gas for example?
 
  • #3
9
0
Dick,
I have no clue what "strategy" to go with, that's the whole reason I'm here.
 
  • #4
Dick
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,258
618
Dick,
I have no clue what "strategy" to go with, that's the whole reason I'm here.
Right, but can you think of two objects whose masses are equal but have different internal energies? Two objects whose densities are equal but have different internal energies etc. etc. That's the sort of strategy I'm talking about. Are ANY of those true? All I know is guessing won't work. They wouldn't give you this question if you didn't know SOMETHING.
 
Last edited:
  • #5
Dick
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,258
618
You've got the right general idea about what internal energy is, that's a start. But try and make that general idea more concrete. Don't you have ANY specific examples to reason from? Like I said ideal gases would be a good starting point. But why do you think temperature doesn't matter? Doesn't that determine internal kinetic energies and vibrational energies? Are you really supposed to answer this starting from ground zero?
 
  • #6
9
0
Yes, ground zero. I am leaning towards mass and temperature as the answer to the question.
 
  • #7
9
0
I will have two lectures on thermodynamics in the coming week. I'm trying to complete online homework and can't find a good source of information for this question.
 
  • #8
9
0
I think I've got it.

The objects have to have the same mass in order to have equal heat capacity.

The objects have to have the same temperature to be in thermal equilibrium.

If there heat capacity and thermal equilibrium are identical, their internal energy will be the same.
 
  • #9
Dick
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,258
618
I think I've got it.

The objects have to have the same mass in order to have equal heat capacity.

The objects have to have the same temperature to be in thermal equilibrium.

If there heat capacity and thermal equilibrium are identical, their internal energy will be the same.
No, that's not it. If sample A has internal energy E, and sample B has internal energy 2E, then two copies of A have the same internal energy as B, right? Internal energy is an extensive property, yes? Do A and B have to have any properties in common?
 
  • #10
9
0
Here it is...
 

Attachments

  • #11
Dick
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,258
618
If it's 'separate objects cannot have equal internal energies', that's a bunch of baloney.
 
  • #12
9
0
the image shows my response just minutes ago. you can see it gave me credit for my response. (my response in green) the check mark is just in a weird spot, thats not the answer.

thanks for your efforts.
 
  • #13
Dick
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,258
618
Well, congratulations. I really can't agree with their answers. But there you go. You're welcome.
 

Related Threads on Multiple Choice problem (internal energy)

  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
721
Replies
5
Views
5K
Replies
8
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
6K
Top