Need a pair of forumlas to help me build a lifting platform

In summary, the conversation revolves around building a platform for Olympic weightlifting and minimizing its weight. The main focus is on estimating the sturdiness of the platform by considering factors such as the distance between beams, the thickness of the board, and the placement of supports. The ultimate goal is to reduce the weight of the platform while maintaining its strength. The formula for estimating the strength difference for the board for different spacings of the beams is discussed, as well as the relationship between strength and thickness. The conversation ends with the individual sharing their solution for reducing the weight of the platform and expressing curiosity about the mathematical and physics aspects of the problem.
  • #1
zyberwoof
3
0
I'm planning on building a platform for Olympic weightlifting. I'm trying to minimize the weight, so I'd like to be able to properly estimate the sturdiness.

The first one is for a piece of wood sitting on beams of some sort. I know that as the beams move father and farther apart, the board can support less and less weight inbetween the beams.

What is the formula for estimating the strength difference for the board for different spacings of the beams? I.e. If the board has a limit of 10 lbs with the beams x inches apart, what is the weight limit with the beams y inches apart?The second question has to do with relating the strength to the thickness of a board. For a scenario like above, imagine that the distance of the beams are fixed, but the thickness of the board is not. What is the formula that let's me relate the strength to the thickness of an item?

Ex: If a board 1/2" thick can support 10 lbs, how much weight can a board 3/4" thick support?In case you can't tell, I'm hoping to have a board sitting on beams, and I'm trying to estimate how thick to make the board and how far apart to have the beams. The thinner/farther apart, the lighter it will be. Sorry to post this in two different places. I'm hoping that the reason I didn't get a response in the General Physics board is that it was the wrong place.
 
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  • #2
Something this important to the safety of the particiapants should involve someone like a civil engineeer. I don't know if stress/strain information is available for ordinary boards as opposed to beams designed to handle a load.
 
  • #3
Not sure what you are trying to achieve but your boards will be at their strongest if your two supports (underneath) are placed 1/3 and 2/3 of the way along the boards, not at the ends.
 
  • #4
Jeff Reid said:
Something this important to the safety of the particiapants should involve someone like a civil engineeer. I don't know if stress/strain information is available for ordinary boards as opposed to beams designed to handle a load.

It will be used just by me at my home.

Studiot said:
Not sure what you are trying to achieve but your boards will be at their strongest if your two supports (underneath) are placed 1/3 and 2/3 of the way along the boards, not at the ends.

To give more details, my platform will be 4' x 4', and will be raised off the ground by pieces of wood. The number of pieces and spacing is one thing I was trying to decide on. The platform will be raised so that I can put layers of carpet next to either side of the platform to drop the weight on, reducing noise and damage to the concrete below.

My platform's estimates were getting above 70 lbs, which would be difficult to move around daily.

I think I have solved my problem and found how to get the weight down. However, I still am curious just from a mathematical/physics standpoint how to relate the strength of two similar objects of varying thickness and how adjusting the spacing effects the maximum load. I majored in math a few years ago, so you can understand my general curiosity for this.
 
  • #5
Most structures are limited by excessive deflection not ultimate failure (breaking).
 

What is a lifting platform?

A lifting platform is a raised, solid surface that is used for weightlifting exercises such as squats, deadlifts, and Olympic lifts. It provides a stable and safe surface for lifting heavy weights.

Why do I need a pair of formulas to build a lifting platform?

Formulas are necessary in order to determine the appropriate dimensions and materials needed to construct a lifting platform that can safely support the amount of weight being lifted. They also ensure that the platform is level and stable.

What are the main components of a lifting platform?

The main components of a lifting platform include a solid base made of plywood or rubber, a top layer of plywood or rubber for added stability and grip, and a frame made of wood or metal to hold the base and top layers together.

How do I calculate the dimensions of a lifting platform?

To calculate the dimensions of a lifting platform, you will need to consider the amount of space you have available, the type of weightlifting exercises you will be doing, and the amount of weight you will be lifting. From there, you can use formulas to determine the appropriate size of the base and frame.

Are there any safety considerations when building a lifting platform?

Yes, there are several safety considerations when building a lifting platform. It is important to ensure that the platform is sturdy and level to prevent any accidents or injuries. Additionally, make sure to use materials that can support the weight being lifted and to secure all components properly.

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