Need fast help, (solid mechanics)

In summary, The conversation is about a project involving FEM calculation and validating tensions in a construction. The speaker is trying to figure out how to calculate the tension for the beams in a structurally indeterminate system, and is asking for advice on what method to use. They also ask for the difference between truss constructions and solid mechanics. Another person suggests using a method of dividing the structure into symmetric and asymmetric parts and solving for the symmetry axis. The original speaker thanks them for the suggestion and asks for help with their initial questions. The conversation then moves on to discussing a specific problem involving a plate made of an elastic and perfectly plastic material. The first person asks for help with finding the applied remote stress that leads to initial yielding and the maximum
  • #1
paul-martin
27
0
Hi. We are doing a project in school with FEM calculation, and i am off to validate the tensions in the construction, but i do not know how i get the tension in the construction by hand calculation seen it is statically indeterminate, and it isn’t a truss.

My question is how can I calculate the tension for the beams?, (what method do I have to use)

What is the diffrent's from a truss construction in a solid mechanics point of view?

http://img197.exs.cx/img197/8416/problem.jpg
 
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  • #2
paul-martin said:
Hi. We are doing a project in school with FEM calculation, and i am off to validate the tensions in the construction, but i do not know how i get the tension in the construction by hand calculation seen it is statically indeterminate, and it isn’t a truss.

My question is how can I calculate the tension for the beams?, (what method do I have to use)

What is the diffrent's from a truss construction in a solid mechanics point of view?

http://img197.exs.cx/img197/8416/problem.jpg

It seems to me the typical problem to divide the structure into a symmetric part and another asymmetric part, and solving cutting the structure by the symmetry axis. Are you familiar with this method?
 
  • #3
Clausius2 said:
It seems to me the typical problem to divide the structure into a symmetric part and another asymmetric part, and solving cutting the structure by the symmetry axis. Are you familiar with this method?

Thx;l i have read about it, i will think about it, if you can please answer the outer questions.

Kindly Paul-M
 
  • #4
paul-martin said:
What is the diffrent's from a truss construction in a solid mechanics point of view?

Could you rephrase your question? It doesn't make a whole lot of sense as to what you are asking.

Have you looked at the method of sections for trusses?
 
  • #5
FredGarvin said:
Could you rephrase your question? It doesn't make a whole lot of sense as to what you are asking.

Have you looked at the method of sections for trusses?

It isn't a truss, my problem is that i need more then the 3 equilibrium equations.
 
  • #6
paul-martin said:
It isn't a truss, my problem is that i need more then the 3 equilibrium equations.

I have looked for the translation of "truss" in spanish, but sure you would laugh at it if I tell you what that means in spanish.

Sure your structure is hyperstatic. You only have 3 equations for static equilibrium, and 6 unknown forces on each support.

When one finds this kind of situations, you must write additional equations for Compatibility of Movements of the supported extremes. For instance you know that the left bottom support cannot neither rotate, neither go upwards, nor go downwards. These three conditions give you the three additional equations you need. Another method of resolution would be therefore to release the left support (leaving it being suspended in air) and so your structure will be Isostatic. In particular, you will have three unknown forces acting on this support (one vertical, another horizontal and a bending moment).
 
  • #7
hiiii its me peer...i need some help to solve dis problem.
A thin plate containing a central hole is made of an elastic and perfectly plastic material with youngs modulus E=200GN/M,Poissons ratio v= 0.3 and yield strength infinity=100MPA, D=0.4M,L=2M,W=1.2M.THE THICKNESS OF PLATE IS 0.01

A. find the applied remote stress (infinity) that leads to the initial yielding of any where in the plate.show the distribution of von mises and deformation of the plate at this applied stress.
B.find the maximum possible stress (infinity) that the plate can carry before full plastic collapse.show the distribution of von mises stress and deformation of the plate immediately before this applied stress is reached.
 
  • #8
any 1 please reply me soon as possible
 

Related to Need fast help, (solid mechanics)

1. What is solid mechanics?

Solid mechanics is a branch of mechanics that deals with the behavior of solid materials when subjected to external forces. It involves the study of how solids deform, move, and react to different types of loads and stresses.

2. Why is solid mechanics important?

Solid mechanics is important because it helps us understand and predict the behavior of various solid materials, which is essential in designing and analyzing structures and machines. It also plays a crucial role in fields such as civil engineering, aerospace engineering, and materials science.

3. What are the basic principles of solid mechanics?

The basic principles of solid mechanics include equilibrium, compatibility, and constitutive laws. Equilibrium refers to the balance of forces and moments acting on a body, while compatibility deals with the deformation and displacement of a body. Constitutive laws describe the relationship between the stress and strain of a material.

4. What are the different types of stress and strain in solid mechanics?

The three main types of stress in solid mechanics are tensile, compressive, and shear stress. Tensile stress occurs when a material is pulled apart, compressive stress is when it is squeezed together, and shear stress is when two forces act in opposite directions parallel to the surface of the material. The corresponding strains are known as tensile, compressive, and shear strains.

5. How can solid mechanics be applied in real-world situations?

Solid mechanics can be applied in various real-world situations, such as designing and analyzing structures such as bridges, buildings, and aircraft. It is also used in the development of new materials and products, as well as in the study of natural phenomena such as earthquakes and landslides.

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