Need help finding distance of skier going down a hill Help

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In summary, the conversation is about a skier on a slope and determining how far they will slide before coming to rest. The initial speed, angle of the slope, and coefficient of kinetic friction are given. The conversation includes a discussion of relevant equations and forces involved, and the person seeking help ultimately understands the problem and thanks the helpers.
  • #1
Mocambo
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Homework Statement


A skier on a slope inclined at 4.7Degrees to the horizontal pushes on ski poles and starts down the slope. The initial speed is 2.7m/s. The coefficient of kinetic friction between skis and snow is 0.11. Determine how far the skier will slide before coming to rest.


Homework Equations


Mew(k) = F(k)/F(N)

v2^2 = v1^2 + 2a(d)

F=ma

I can't really think of others that would apply.


The Attempt at a Solution



At first I tried multiplying the initial velocity into the angle given to get :

2.7*(cos4.7) = 2.6909m/s

But I am not sure how to go from there, or even if I am on the right path here. I assume that acceleration of gravity will be 9.8m/s^2 so I could possibly get the Force through multiplying initial velocity into gravity :

(9.8)*(2.7(cos4.7)) = 26.37082 N

Help
 
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  • #2
Mocambo said:
I could possibly get the Force through multiplying initial velocity into gravity

Hi mocambo! Welcome to PF! :smile:

hmm … you're getting very confused.

Think slowly and logically.

There are two forces, not one - consider each separately.

Hint: What force is pulling the skier? How much is it?

What force is stopping the skier? How much is it?

Does either of them depend on the angle?
 
  • #3
First, you should derate the velocity due to the friction. Draw a free body diagram and that should help you out.
 
  • #4
What force is pulling the skier : Gravitational force : 9.8m/s^2 ?

What force is stopping the skier : Force of Friction : .11 Mew(k)

Does either of them depend on the angle: I am not sure unfortunately, possibly the force pulling the skier will depend on the angle most likely .
 
  • #5
coefficient of friction

Mocambo said:
What force is stopping the skier : Force of Friction : .11 Mew(k)

(btw, if you type alt-m, it gives you "µ", instead of "Mew"!
Mew is for cats, but µ is for cool cats! :cool:)

No. µ is the coefficient of friction: that means you have to multiply it by something else. What is that?

Does either of them depend on the angle: I am not sure unfortunately, possibly the force pulling the skier will depend on the angle most likely .

Um … you need to go back to your teacher or your book and find out all about the relationship between forces and angles.
 
  • #6
ok, well I just understood the question a little better and got the answer!

Thanks for all your help!
 

1. How do you calculate the distance of a skier going down a hill?

The distance of a skier going down a hill can be calculated by multiplying the skier's speed by the time it takes them to go down the hill. This can be represented by the formula: distance = speed x time.

2. What units should be used when calculating the distance of a skier going down a hill?

The units used for distance can vary depending on the unit of measurement used for speed and time. Common units for distance include meters, kilometers, feet, and miles. It is important to ensure that all units used are consistent in order to get an accurate calculation.

3. Can the distance of a skier going down a hill be affected by external factors?

Yes, the distance of a skier going down a hill can be affected by external factors such as wind, snow conditions, and the slope of the hill. These factors can impact the skier's speed and therefore affect the overall distance traveled.

4. Is it possible to find the distance of a skier going down a hill without knowing their speed?

No, the speed of the skier is a crucial factor in calculating the distance traveled. If the speed is not known, then the distance cannot be accurately determined.

5. How can the distance of a skier going down a hill be used in skiing competitions?

The distance of a skier going down a hill can be used as a measure of their performance in skiing competitions. It can be compared to other skiers' distances to determine rankings and can also be used to track an individual's progress over time.

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