Need help trying to mimic a phenomenon associated with air pressure

In summary: I RIGHT IN UNDERSTANDING THAT YOU SEE FLASH EVAPORATION WHEN WATER IS PLACED ON A FLAT SURFACE?That's correct. When the water is placed on the flat surface, you see what appears to be a flash of vaporization.
  • #1
Ayrflyer
1
1
Good day everyone, Hope all is well.

Bare with me as I am beginner in the field of understanding air pressure. But could really use help with a certain phenomena that I have been observing with an experiment I have had success with. I am then attempting to build an apparatus that mimics its effects.
I have attached a very basic picture of my experiment that I stumbled upon.

In the picture you will note (C). (C) represents a flat surface. (B) represents a slit about a half of a centimeter in width and is level with the flat surface (C). (A) represents a hallow sphere cut in half so the inside is full of space.In my experiment I run (A) in the direction of the arrow on the picture so that it runs over the slit and then I bring it back the other way. I do this multiple times and seem to be causing what we think is flash evaporation (could be very well wrong) when the flat surface has water over it.
To further study this phenomena we are attempting to understand first what is exactly happening inside the half hallow sphere when it runs past the slit? and 2) What happens inside the sphere once it passes the slit back onto the flat surface where no air is getting out? I presumed much like water passing in a Venturi that it was a low pressure drop. But creating multiple models that induced low air pressure/high air pressure/cyclones/ turbulent air etc have not yielded the results I can get from this simple experiment in the picture. I am now hypothesizing it is rapidly changing from high pressure to low then back to high again. Either way then how would I create an apparatus to mimic that?

So far my models involve me blowing air through a tube or sucking air through the tube that is attached to a container which has variations of tubes shapes etc that are trying to induce different pressures.

If any of you can help that would be greatly appreciated and if you have any good inquiries on an apparatus to create that mimics the effect that is happening in the picture I have attached. I would be willing to show my gratitude with a thank you in the form of a little financial incentive. Not much but a token of my gratitude. I have created so many models and never seem to get it.

Thank you to anyone who takes the time to read this and help me out.Cheers,

Ayrflyer
 

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  • #2
Ayrflyer said:
Summary:: Trying to understand what is happening to the air pressure in a certain experiment and then to mimic that outcome with an easily mobile apparatus.

Good day everyone, Hope all is well.

Bear with me as I am beginner in the field of understanding air pressure. But could really use help with a certain phenomena that I have been observing with an experiment I have had success with. I am then attempting to build an apparatus that mimics its effects.
I have attached a very basic picture of my experiment that I stumbled upon.

In the picture you will note (C). (C) represents a flat surface. (B) represents a slit about a half of a centimeter in width and is level with the flat surface (C). (A) represents a hallow sphere cut in half so the inside is full of space.

In my experiment I run (A) in the direction of the arrow on the picture so that it runs over the slit and then I bring it back the other way. I do this multiple times and seem to be causing what we think is flash evaporation (could be very well wrong) when the flat surface has water over it.
Hi Ayrflyer. Welcome to PF!

If you are going to do experiments you have to follow basic rules. You must state what you did, what you observed, and what you conclude. You have sort of explained what you did and what you seem to conclude (flash evaporation) but not what you observed. What is it that you see and measure?

AM
 
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Related to Need help trying to mimic a phenomenon associated with air pressure

1. What is air pressure and why is it important?

Air pressure is the force exerted by the weight of air molecules in the Earth's atmosphere. It is important because it affects weather patterns, helps regulate the Earth's temperature, and is necessary for the survival of living organisms.

2. How can I mimic a phenomenon associated with air pressure?

To mimic a phenomenon associated with air pressure, you can use a variety of tools and techniques such as air pumps, vacuum chambers, and pressure sensors. These can help you create and measure changes in air pressure levels.

3. What are some examples of phenomena associated with air pressure?

Examples of phenomena associated with air pressure include weather patterns such as high and low pressure systems, wind, and the formation of clouds. Other examples include the expansion and contraction of gases, the movement of objects in a vacuum, and the function of the human respiratory system.

4. How does air pressure change with altitude?

As altitude increases, air pressure decreases. This is because the higher you go in the Earth's atmosphere, the fewer air molecules there are above you, resulting in less weight and therefore less pressure. This is why it is harder to breathe at high altitudes.

5. What are some real-life applications of understanding air pressure?

Understanding air pressure is important in a variety of fields such as meteorology, aviation, and scuba diving. It can also be useful in everyday tasks like inflating tires, using household appliances like air conditioners, and understanding the effects of altitude on the human body.

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