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Nerve connection replace with electricity

  1. Apr 20, 2015 #1
    Let's say I got a nerve electrical signal running in one direction "/" and when the signal gets to the middle of that path I poll for that signal and shoots out a electrical current in the other direction "\" not the electrochemical current, so now I have a shape that looks like "y", does it work as if I have signal running in both direction? So as to connect that electrical current path somewhere else.

    P.S. You use electromagnetic radiation such as maser to time and synchronize the signal. Come on I'm close? It's only 124m/s for electrical synapse transfer speed. If you go pass that you should be able to exploit it. https://www.teachengineering.org/vi.../activities/cmu_fruit/cmu_fruit_activity1.xml
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2015
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  3. Apr 20, 2015 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    Sorry - it is not clear what you are trying to achieve.
    Sure you can detect a nerve impulse with an electric circuit that outputs an electrical signal that goes someplace else - say: along a wire - usually to the recording equipment, but it can also run other equipment or go someplace else in the body to stimulate other nerves. This is established tech.

    I don't know what you mean by having a shape of a Y ... what you have described is a nerve signal and an electric current. You can make an electric current go in any direction you like.
     
  4. Apr 20, 2015 #3
    Let's say you have a strand of neuron on top and then another one at the bottom like the stick figure below, the bottom one carries an electrical signal represented as the star shape moving to the left. These are two parallel neurons and insulated. Now when the electrical signal reaches the left end, I try to bridge the top and bottom and have this signal redirected to the top and then it goes back down again when it reaches the top right to complete the loop. Keep in mind that the neuron is insulated so they cannot travel out of their path, but that is my idea of what a synchronized state should be that. The electrical signal circulating to the top and then back to the bottom should be kept at 124m/s which is the nerve impulse travel speed. Technically the signal would keep traveling to the left so the signal on the top left would have to be manually created by matching the speed of 124m/s. Now the consciousness as a whole should interpret the top and bottom neuron as a single unit and being able to interpret the memory stored in both places. There can be trillion of these connections going on, but if I match every single one of the connections well within the speed of 124m/s, will I eventually be able to synchronize the 2 brains together? Technically the consciousness should interpret them as a single unit, but that is my question I suppose.
    ------------ | ------------ |*---------- |-------------|
    -----*------ -> |*------------ -> |------------ -> |------------*|
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2015
  5. Apr 20, 2015 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    ... so the star in the bottom line is moving in the opposite direction to the arrows?

    ...OK, you want to make a circuit by putting an electrical gizmo at each end of a neuron - a nerve cell.

    This sentence is not grammatical.

    ... since the top and bottom structures are neurons, though, wouldn't the signals automatically travel at the normal conduction velocity in the cell? Incidentally, 124m/s seems rather fast for a nerve signal - I have 3-120m/s as commonly cited - depending on the nerve type. But I suspect that's a bit of a side issue.

    ... now you've lost me: "consciousness as a whole"? You are not usually conscious of the state of an individual nerve. memory is not usually considered to be stored in a neuron loop, and we do not have a solution to the mind-body problem anyway.

    It seems you are hypothizing that you can network two brains 1-1 like this ... well, then how would the brains get any input from outside the net?
    Brains don't work that way ... and I suspect you are about to run foul of the personal theory rule.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2015
  6. Apr 20, 2015 #5
    Right, the personal theory rule, I kept running into it. Thanks for the reply though.
     
  7. Apr 20, 2015 #6

    Simon Bridge

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    Edited: that's "mind-body problem" not "mid-body problem".
     
  8. Apr 20, 2015 #7

    berkeman

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    This thread is done.
     
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