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Nested intervals, uncountable sets, unique points.

  • Thread starter mathkiddi
  • Start date
  • #1
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Homework Statement



Let [a,b] be an interval and let A be a subset of [a,b] and suppose that A is an infinite set.

Suppose that A is uncountable. Prove that there exists a point z which is an element of [a,b] such that A intersect I is uncountable for every open interval I that contains z.

Homework Equations



I don't really know how to start this problem. I know I can use the fact that a set that contains an uncountable subset is uncountable. Any help would be appreciated

The Attempt at a Solution



I know z is an element of I, and that I is uncountable. I also know z is an element of [an, bn]. I know there exists a unique point z in [an, bn] and I know A is uncountable.

Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
matt grime
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
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Do you know about compactness?
 
  • #3
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no, we have not covered compactness.
 
  • #4
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mathkiddi, what "completeness" axioms/theorems have you covered? Specifically, have you covered any of these:

least upper bound, bounded monotone sequences, Bolzano-Weierstrass, Heine-Borel, nested intervals, or anything like these? limit points? accumulation points? subsequences?

I also know z is an element of [an, bn].
What is [an, bn]?
 

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