Net Electric Field: +q1 -q2 Spot at 0 E

In summary, two charges, +q1 and -q2, are located 5.22 m apart on a line. The net electric field is zero at a spot 2.55 m to the right of -q2. There are also two spots on the line where the potential is zero. (a) One spot is located to the left of -q2. (b) The other spot is located to the right of -q2.
  • #1
ptdreamer
3
0
A positive charge of +q1 is located 5.22 m to the left of a negative charge -q2. The charges have different magnitudes. On the line through the charges, the net electric field is zero at a spot 2.55 m to the right of the negative charge. On this line there are also two spots where the potential is zero. (a) How far to the left of the negative charge is one spot? (b) How far to the right of the negative charge is the other?


E= kq1/5.22^2m + k(-q)/2.55^2m = 0
I think that this is the first equation that I use. I am not sure if I have set it up right.

and then I use this equation I think.
kq1/x1+ k(-q)/5.22-x1=0?

Overall, I just need someone to clarify PLEASE!
 
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  • #2
Hi ptdreamer! :smile:
ptdreamer said:
E= kq1/5.22^2m + k(-q)/2.55^2m = 0
I think that this is the first equation that I use. I am not sure if I have set it up right.

and then I use this equation I think.
kq1/x1+ k(-q)/5.22-x1=0?

Overall, I just need someone to clarify PLEASE!

Yes, that's all good, but of course it only gives you one of the spots …

how should you adjust the second equation to get the other one? :wink:
 
  • #3


I can confirm that the equations you have set up are correct and are a good starting point for solving this problem. However, it is important to note that the net electric field is zero at a spot between the two charges, not necessarily at the spot 2.55 m to the right of the negative charge. This means that the distance x1, which represents the distance from the negative charge to the first spot where the net electric field is zero, is not necessarily 2.55 m.

To solve for the distance x1, you can set up the equation as follows:

kq1/x1^2 + k(-q)/(5.22-x1)^2 = 0

This equation represents the balance between the electric field created by the positive charge at a distance x1 and the electric field created by the negative charge at a distance 5.22-x1. By setting the sum of these two electric fields equal to zero, we can solve for the distance x1.

Similarly, to solve for the distance x2, which represents the distance from the negative charge to the second spot where the potential is zero, you can set up the following equation:

kq1/x2 + k(-q)/(5.22+x2)^2 = 0

This equation represents the balance between the potential created by the positive charge at a distance x2 and the potential created by the negative charge at a distance 5.22+x2. By setting the sum of these two potentials equal to zero, we can solve for the distance x2.

Once you have solved for both x1 and x2, you can use these values to answer the questions of how far to the left and right of the negative charge the two spots are located. I hope this helps clarify the problem for you.
 

Related to Net Electric Field: +q1 -q2 Spot at 0 E

1. What is the net electric field at the spot where there are two charges, +q1 and -q2, located at 0 E?

The net electric field at this spot can be calculated by adding the individual electric fields produced by each charge. The direction of the net electric field will depend on the relative magnitudes and positions of the two charges.

2. How do you determine the direction of the net electric field at this spot?

The direction of the net electric field can be determined by the direction of the individual electric fields produced by each charge. If the two charges are of equal magnitude, the net electric field will be zero. If the two charges have different magnitudes, the net electric field will point towards the stronger charge.

3. How does the distance between the two charges affect the net electric field at this spot?

The net electric field at this spot is inversely proportional to the distance between the two charges. As the distance increases, the net electric field decreases. This is because the individual electric fields produced by each charge become weaker with distance.

4. Can the net electric field at this spot be zero?

Yes, it is possible for the net electric field to be zero at this spot. This can happen if the two charges have equal magnitudes and are located at equal distances from the spot. In this case, the individual electric fields produced by each charge cancel each other out, resulting in a net electric field of zero.

5. How is the net electric field at this spot affected by the size of the charges?

The net electric field at this spot is directly proportional to the magnitude of the charges. If the charges are larger, the net electric field will be stronger, and if the charges are smaller, the net electric field will be weaker. However, the direction of the net electric field will still depend on the relative magnitudes and positions of the two charges.

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