Neutron flux calculation using FFT in a nuclear reactor

In summary, the conversation is discussing the use of neutron detectors in a project. The specific questions involve how neutron detectors are detected and what the probable graph of count rate vs. pulse height might look like for a nuclear fission reaction of U-235. The type of detector used depends on the application, with examples including fission detectors, detectors using (n,p) scattering, and detectors using Rh or V (n-capture). Some specific types of detectors mentioned include boron-10 proportional counters using BF3 gas, Helium-3 gas proportional chambers, and Lithium-6 detectors.
  • #1
praharmitra
311
1
well, that's the heading of a project i am doing...i need some help on neutron detectors...

how they are dectected and what is the probable graph of count rate vs, pulse height that i might get for a nuclar fission reaction of U-235...

can anyone help?
 
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  • #2
i am doing similar project
 
  • #3
Is one doing a fission detector or a neutron detector, and is one doing detections of neutrons ex-reactor, or for a power reactor (in-core or ex-core) detector?

The application determines the type of detector.

For example there are fission detectors that use the fission reaction. There are detectors which use the (n,p) scattering.

And there are detectors that use Rh or V (n-capture).

See - http://www.tpub.com/content/doe/h1013v2/css/h1013v2_76.htm
 
  • #4
There are several detectors of thermal neutrons. A boron-10 proportional counter uses BF3 gas. See
http://www.orau.org/PTP/collection/proportional counters/bf3info.htm
Helium-3 is also used in gas proportional chambers. When it absorbs a neutron, it fissions to a proton plus tritium, plus about 763 KeV of kinetic energy. In both cases, the pulse height is taken off the anode wire using capacitor coupling, and is independent of the neutron energy. Lithium-6 is also used.
 

1. What is a neutron flux?

A neutron flux is the number of neutrons passing through a unit area in a given amount of time. It is an important parameter in nuclear reactors as it affects the rate of nuclear reactions and the production of energy.

2. How is neutron flux calculated in a nuclear reactor?

Neutron flux can be calculated using a variety of methods, including the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique. This involves analyzing the frequency components of neutron signals using mathematical algorithms to determine the neutron flux.

3. Why is FFT used for neutron flux calculation in nuclear reactors?

FFT is commonly used for neutron flux calculation in nuclear reactors because it allows for efficient and accurate analysis of large amounts of data. It also takes into account the time-varying nature of neutron flux, making it a suitable method for real-time monitoring and control of a reactor.

4. What factors can affect the accuracy of neutron flux calculation using FFT?

The accuracy of FFT-based neutron flux calculation can be affected by various factors, including the quality of the input data, the choice of FFT algorithm, and the presence of noise or other disturbances in the system. It is important to carefully select and validate these factors to ensure reliable results.

5. How can neutron flux calculation using FFT be applied in nuclear reactor research and development?

Neutron flux calculation using FFT has a wide range of applications in nuclear reactor research and development, including reactor design, performance optimization, and safety analysis. It can also aid in the detection of abnormal reactor conditions and the development of control strategies to mitigate potential risks.

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