New interest in classical music

In summary, the best thing about taking an intersession music appreciation course is that I now have a new interest in music from the classical era. I recommend listening to classical music with the volume turned up as much as possible. Some recommendations include listening to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, Handel's Messiah, and Mozart's Great Mass in C.
  • #1
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After taking an intersession music appreciation course, I have a new interest in music from the classical era.

Mozart's Symphony #40 in G minor is the best sound I've ever heard - period. Anyone have any recommendations for other things I should check out?

I hear it's great to have in the background while reading!
 
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  • #2
I was thinking 'classical' music in general, and had a list posted.
But you're interested in the 'classical era'. Not my favorite.
Anyway, good luck.
 
  • #3
There are lots. If you particularly like that, the next symphony, no. 41 (Jupiter), perhaps?
 
  • #4
Skip the aria from Turandot. I slept through it.
 
  • #5
Jimmy Snyder said:
Skip the aria from Turandot. I slept through it.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

None shall!
 
  • #6
What you should do is listen to a radio station that plays the classics. That way you will get a broad selection and can note the ones you like the best. Then you tell us what's good.

Edit: I was only joking about Turandot. The aria is called Nessun Dorma (no one sleeps) and is one of the finest pieces of music ever. It was a favorite of Pavarotti.
 
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  • #7
Jimmy Snyder said:
Edit: I was only joking about Turandot. The aria is called Nessun Dorma (no one sleeps) and is one of the finest pieces of music ever. It was a favorite of Pavarotti.


I think the translation I thought of uses the imperative, which seems to work, too.:smile:
http://lindalenc.com/videos/pavarotti.htm
 
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  • #8
1MileCrash said:
Mozart's Symphony #40 in G minor is the best sound I've ever heard - period. Anyone have any recommendations for other things I should check out?

If you want to stick with Mozart, try some of his concertos. My favorite is his clarinet concerto, which is truly sublime. Next would come some of the piano concertos, maybe #24 or #21. But it's hard to go really wrong with Mozart. I like the rest of his wind concertos a lot, too: horn, flute, oboe, bassoon. Oh, and the Sinfonia Concertante for violin, viola and orchestra (sort of a double concerto). When I get the opening bars in my head, I can't get it out for hours.

For someone similar to Mozart, try his contemporary Joseph Martin Kraus, the "Swedish Mozart." You can find a bunch of his stuff on the Naxos label.

When I started listening to classical music years ago (referring to the whole genre now, not just the Mozart/Haydn/Beethoven era), I started from a few different "centers" and worked my way outward to related composers that were mentioned in the notes on the backs of LPs (yes, I'm that old) and in books, magazine articles, etc.

For example, one place I started was with Beethoven, because it happened to be his bicentennial year (1970). He led me quickly to Haydn and Mozart, and then I went backward to Bach, Handel and Vivaldi, and forward to Mendelssohn, Schubert, Berlioz, etc.

Another place I started with was Sibelius, because a couple of my grandparents came from Finland. He led me to other Nordic composers from around 1900: Grieg, Nielsen, Stenhammar; and then backwards and forwards to earlier and (mostly) more contemporary composers from that region. This has always been my bigggest "specialty."
 
  • #9
Talking about Nessun Dorma, of course the stunning performance of Paul Potts is a classic.

 
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  • #10
Musical taste is, of course, a very personal and opinionated topic. I understand fully when people disagree with my musical preferences, because usually they are complete idiots who cannot see why my opinions are the only truly correct ones. Wait, did I type that? I meant only to think it, sorry. Dang, my delete button isn't working. Oh well.

My priceless two cents: despite being "Baroque," there is no classical music better than J.S. Bach. Look into the compositions for single instruments. A recent re-release of Gould playing the Goldberg Variations (with his "humming along" digitally edited out), and anything written for the cello as played by Casals or Ma are two things to consider.

These are all "safe" places to go, where you're sure to not be disappointed. One last thing, these are not good as "background" music.
 
  • #11
Chi Meson said:
Gould playing the Goldberg Variations (with his "humming along" digitally edited out)

Sacrilege! :eek:

That's like editing out the coughs from the audience in the famous live recording of Sviatoslav Richter playing Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" at a concert in Sofia, Bulgaria during a flu epidemic.
 
  • #12
If you are going to "listen" to great music really listen to it don't have it on as something nice in the background.
Try these with the volume turned up as much as you can (or with headphones on).
Handel Messiah
Beethoven Ninth (Choral)
Mazart Great Mass in C
 
  • #13
jtbell said:
That's like editing out the coughs from the audience in the famous live recording of Sviatoslav Richter playing Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" at a concert in Sofia, Bulgaria during a flu epidemic.

Ballet of the Unblown Noses?
Limgoes, le Mouchoirs?
The Cough of the Baba Yaga?
The Great Sneeze of Kiev?
 
  • #14
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  • #15
Recently got the complete works of Mozart and some of his early symphonies are great.
Beethoven 9th works for me too.

Edvard Grieg - Peer Gynt Suite #1 Op 46., specifically "In the Hall of the Mountain King"

Not classical, but romantic opera composer, Giuseppe Verdi - La Traviata (The Drinking Song) has stuck with ever since the professor from my classical appreciation class mockingly stumbled around as a drunk while playing it for the class.

There are some specific movements from various compositions that I enjoy, mostly from that class.

Joseph Haydn's Symphony #94, I think it is the 2nd movement, also called the "surprise" movement as occasionally throughout it, there are sudden chords that create the surprise. My professor explained that back during the composer's days, it would not be unusual for people to pay the admittance fee, then sleep during the performance, and Haydn's wrote the second movement to wake them up. Apparently Haydn was known for having many jokes in his works.
 
  • #16
Check out Bach's organ fuges. You will be blown away. Look for Baroque stations on the net or search for
Ivan Sokol
J.S. Bach, Preludes and Fuges. 17 songs
 
  • #17
You cannot appreciate the genre without listening to Beethoven and Brahms. Period!

Mozart is the rosé of classical music :-p
 
  • #18
The Four Seasons by Antonio Vivaldi.
 
  • #19
Vanadium 50 said:
The Great Sneeze of Kiev?

Reminds me of Kodaly's "Hary Janos" suite starting with a loud orchestral "sneeze," which supposedly comes from a Hungarian maxim: you can tell that a tale is going to be a "tall" one when the narrator starts out by sneezing. :smile:
 
  • #20
Here's a few Norwegian pieces:
Duration given in (minutes:seconds)

Ole Bull (1810-80)
(A dairy maid's Sunday) (2:59)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXqnLooMLO0&feature=related
Christian Sinding (1856-1941)
"Rustle in Spring" (2:24)


Rikard Nordraak (1842-66)
"Purpose" (1:39)

Nordraak was the composer of the Norwegian National Anthem.

Johan Halvorsen (1864-1935):
"Entry March of the Boyars" (5:31)


Edvard Fliflet Bræin (1924-1976)
"Out towards the Sea" (2:45)


Harald Sæverud (1897-1992)
"Rondo Amoroso" (5:27) (originally composed for solo piano)

"Ballad of Revolt" (4:22) (originally for solo piano, arranged for His Majesty's Guard, by Alf Blyverket)

The Ballad of Revolt was written in 1942, born of the frustration of the German occupation of Norway, and is Sæverud's tribute to those who were fighting them.Johan Svendsen (1840-1911)
Festival Polonaise

This is the polonaise of choice for Norwegians at parties supposed to do polonaises.

Fartein Valen (1887-1952)
"Churchyard by the sea" (9:55)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YeJa_TnB0M&feature=related
"Ave Maria" (6:58)

Fartein Valen is ranked as one of the pioneering modernists, along with SchoenbergGeirr Tveitt (1908-82)
"Welcome with Honor" (3:35)
 
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  • #21
arildno said:
Here's a few Norwegian pieces:
Duration given in (minutes:seconds)


You list eight Norwegian composers and leave out Edvard Grieg?
 
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  • #22
SW VandeCarr said:
You list eight Norwegian composers and leave out Edvard Grieg?
Yes.
Because everybody has heard of him, and probably heard music by him.
I wanted to present a few others.

But here's one by him as well, since you ask for it.

His "Funeral March" tribute to his cousin and fellow composer Rikard Nordraak:
 
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  • #23
arildno said:
Yes.
Because everybody has heard of him, and probably heard music by him.
I wanted to present a few others.

The OP said he was new to classical music, so it's possible that he hasn't heard of him. Possibly he's heard the opening lines of the Piano Concerto in A Minor but doesn't know who wrote it. In any case, I won't report you to your king for this shocking omission.
 
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  • #24
SW VandeCarr said:
The OP said he was new to classical music, so it's possible that he hasn't heard of him. Possibly he's heard the opening lines of Piano Concerto in A Minor but doesn't know who wrote it. In any case, I won't report you to your king for this shocking omission.

As a redemptive measure, I post one of his most characteristic folk music inspired songs, "Blueberry Slope":


It's about finding a hillside where a lot of blueberries grow.
 
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  • #25
First I'm musician. I play the guitar and do enjoy playing some classical music such as Recuerdos de Alhambra and Romansa. However, as in the visual and all other arts, I like some and I hate some. Actually, to say that one likes a certain genre without reservations is hyperbole at best.
 
  • #26
if you like classical music try Ravel's Bolero. its kind of long, (14 minutes) but it is my favorite.
 

1. What is causing the recent surge of interest in classical music?

There are a few factors contributing to the renewed interest in classical music. One is the increasing accessibility of classical music through online streaming services and social media platforms. Additionally, many orchestras and classical music organizations are incorporating more modern and diverse programming to attract a wider audience. The rise of cross-genre collaborations and the use of classical music in popular media and advertising have also contributed to its popularity.

2. Is there any scientific evidence to support the benefits of listening to classical music?

There have been numerous studies on the effects of classical music on the brain and overall well-being. Some research suggests that listening to classical music can improve cognitive function, reduce stress and anxiety, and even enhance productivity and creativity. However, more studies are needed to fully understand the potential benefits of classical music on the mind and body.

3. Are there any specific composers or pieces of classical music that are recommended for beginners?

For beginners, it is recommended to start with some of the well-known and more accessible composers such as Mozart, Beethoven, and Bach. As for specific pieces, some popular choices for beginners include Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata," Mozart's "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik," and Bach's "Brandenburg Concertos." However, everyone's musical preferences are different, so it is always best to explore and discover what resonates with you personally.

4. Can listening to classical music make you smarter?

The idea that listening to classical music can make you smarter is known as the "Mozart Effect," which is a theory that listening to classical music can temporarily boost cognitive abilities. However, there is no conclusive evidence to support this claim, and more recent studies have shown that any potential effects are short-lived and vary from person to person. So while listening to classical music may not make you smarter, it can still have many other positive effects on the mind and body.

5. How can I get involved in the classical music community?

There are many ways to get involved in the classical music community, even if you are not a musician yourself. You can attend concerts and performances, join a local orchestra or choir, volunteer at a classical music organization, or even start your own classical music listening group. Additionally, social media and online forums are great places to connect with others who share a love for classical music and discuss upcoming events and performances.

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