Not sure where to go after high school?

In summary: With a bit of luck, you could easily find a job in it after you graduate. And if you do, you'll have the satisfaction of knowing that you helped contribute to making people's lives better.
  • #1
mayodt
14
0
Hey, I can't decide on what I should go to university for after high school. I enjoy maths and sciences, but I also enjoy the human body (eg. kinesiology). I guess what I'm asking is what kind of jobs could I get in maths or sciences, and possibly what degree that would be if possible. Also, I'm Canadian, if that changes any possible degrees.
Thanks.
 
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  • #2
If you want to apply science in your job you should consider going for engineering. Your job prospects will be a lot better with an engineering degree than with a degree in a pure science or math, unless you get a graduate degree.
 
  • #3
mayodt said:
Hey, I can't decide on what I should go to university for after high school. I enjoy maths and sciences, but I also enjoy the human body (eg. kinesiology). I guess what I'm asking is what kind of jobs could I get in maths or sciences, and possibly what degree that would be if possible. Also, I'm Canadian, if that changes any possible degrees.
Thanks.

As timsea says, engineering is a good field to go into if you enjoy technical things (math and science), and want to have good job prospects after you graduate.

But also, if you think you might enjoy the medical field, I'd encourage you to think about a career in medicine. My first love was physics, but I decided to get my degrees in EE for job security reasons. Now later in my career, I've found that I enjoy patient contacts, and have become an EMT part time. I think if I had it all to do over again, I might have applied to medical school. A good friend of mine from graduate EE school later became a doctor, which he said was always his first interest.

Are you certified in CPR/AED/First Aid? Are there any events near you that ask for medical volunteers? Often large runs or triathlons or charity events will have a medical staff, and they are always looking for volunteers. With just a basic CPR/FA background, you will only be helping with general care tasks, but it's a good way to start to get some patient contacts to see if you like them or not. If you find that you don't enjoy working with folks who can sometimes be very challenging to deal with (but who really do need your help), then medicine is probably not for you. But if you find real rewards in being able to help folks out when they need it most, then you might consider getting your EMT on the side, so that you can get more patient contacts, and help you decide between engineering and medicine.

Enjoy the ride either way! :biggrin:
 
  • #4
Try out biomechanical engineering. It's a cross between biology and mechanical engineering. It's not offered as a "major" but it's an upcoming field.
 
  • #5


I can understand your dilemma and the importance of making informed decisions about your future career path. First of all, it's great that you have a passion for both math and sciences, as well as an interest in the human body. This gives you a wide range of options to explore in terms of potential careers.

In terms of specific jobs in math and sciences, there are many possibilities such as becoming a mathematician, statistician, data analyst, or researcher in a scientific field. With your interest in the human body, you may also want to consider careers in fields such as biomedical engineering, biochemistry, or neuroscience.

In order to determine the best degree for you, I would recommend researching potential universities and their programs in Canada. Many universities offer interdisciplinary programs that combine both math and science courses, which could be a great fit for your interests. You may also want to consider speaking with a career counselor or reaching out to professionals in your desired field to gain more insight and advice.

It's also important to keep in mind that your degree is just the first step towards your career. Many jobs in math and sciences require additional education and training, such as graduate degrees or professional certifications. So, don't be afraid to continue learning and expanding your knowledge beyond your undergraduate degree.

Lastly, being a scientist myself, I can assure you that there is no one "right" path to take. It's important to follow your passions and continue exploring different opportunities until you find the right fit for you. Good luck in your decision-making process!
 

Related to Not sure where to go after high school?

What are some options for continuing education after high school?

There are many options for continuing education after high school, such as attending a four-year university, community college, trade school, or vocational school. You can also consider joining the military, starting an apprenticeship, or taking online courses.

How can I decide which path to take after high school?

It's important to reflect on your interests, skills, and goals when deciding what path to take after high school. Consider talking to a guidance counselor, taking career assessments, and researching different options to help make an informed decision.

What are the benefits of taking a gap year before continuing education?

Taking a gap year can offer a break from academic studies and provide time for personal growth, travel, and gaining real-world experience. It can also help clarify career goals and make you a more well-rounded and mature student when you do decide to continue your education.

Is it necessary to go to college after high school?

No, college is not the only option after high school. There are many other paths you can take, such as trade schools, apprenticeships, or joining the workforce. It's important to choose the path that aligns with your goals and interests.

How can I prepare for life after high school?

To prepare for life after high school, you can focus on developing important skills, such as time management, critical thinking, and communication. You can also research different career options and internships, and start building a strong resume and portfolio. It's also important to maintain good grades and participate in extracurricular activities to make yourself a competitive candidate for future opportunities.

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