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Nuetron nuetral?

  1. Mar 18, 2009 #1
    if the nuetron is nuetral in charge then how does it have an anti-particle?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 18, 2009 #2

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    A neutron (note spelling) is a composite particle. It is made of an up-quark (charge +2/3 e) and two down-quarks (each with charge -1/3 e). An antineutron is made of an anti-up-quark and two anti-down-quarks.
     
  4. Mar 18, 2009 #3
    oh i see , how do they accelerate neutrons!
     
  5. Mar 19, 2009 #4

    jtbell

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    As far as I know, we don't accelerate neutrons. We produce them with the desired energy, by some suitable reaction. Once we have them, we can block them with shielding, but we can't accelerate or "steer" them.
     
  6. Mar 19, 2009 #5
    what about the Neutron magnetic moment?
     
  7. Mar 19, 2009 #6
    Do you suggest to use the magnetic moment to accelerate neutrons ? Usually when we talk about particle accelerators, we're mostly interested in this part of the acceleration which is parallel to the momentum.
     
  8. Mar 19, 2009 #7
    im just asking is it possible
     
  9. Mar 19, 2009 #8
    As far as I know, yes it is possible, using gravity, so it's not quite effective.

    But if the goal is to produce a neutron beam, there are spallation sources as well.
     
  10. Mar 19, 2009 #9
    i see thanks for the info.
     
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