Why does the Sun need sunlight?

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Why does the Sun need sunlight?
A photon is different from an electron. At least by the fact that it is neutral. But, flying into the silicon lattice, it knocks out an electron and takes its place. That is, it becomes an electron.

How does such a magical transformation happen?



I may be wrong, but I think that a photon becomes an electron just by changing the direction of rotation.



That is, a proton, an electron, a photon are the same particle that has different directions of rotation.



Continuing my amateur guesses, I will develop my idea. If a photon (light) differs from an electron only in the direction of rotation, then theoretically the flow of photons can be affected (for example, by a magnetic field), change the rotation and turn it into a flow of electrons and / or protons.



I may be wrong, but I think that this is the key to solving the existence of such a phenomenon as the "Solar Wind".



Getting to the Earth, the flow of photons turns into a set of electrons (or protons). Why is this necessary? So that the Earth sits firmly in orbit. I understand that the Earth itself has a non-neutral charge, quite definite (positive or negative). But the charge can be lost (as with any battery). And the Sun "recharges" the Earth. That is, sunlight is not an abstract thing, but a mechanism for maintaining communication between the Sun and the planets of the Solar system.



Hence the explanation of the variability of solar radiation (periods of solar activity). When the Sun "feels" the weakening of the connection, it emits more light.

I would like to hear the opinion of respected physicists. Thanks.
 
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Dale
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I may be wrong, but I think that a photon becomes an electron
This is very wrong. It violates the conservation of spin, charge, and four-momentum
 
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Summary:: Why does the Sun need sunlight?

I would like to hear the opinion of respected physicists.
Noen of this is correct.
 
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Dale
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A photon is different from an electron. At least by the fact that it is neutral. But, flying into the silicon lattice, it knocks out an electron and takes its place. That is, it becomes an electron.
No, it does not. The photoelectric effect does not turn photons into electrons.


How does such a magical transformation happen?
It doesn’t.


I may be wrong, but I think that a photon becomes an electron just by changing the direction of rotation.
As mentioned above this violates several conservation laws: charge, spin, four-momentum, angular momentum, and probably others.


That is, a proton, an electron, a photon are the same particle that has different directions of rotation.
No, an electron with a different direction of rotation is another electron, not a photon or proton.


Continuing my amateur guesses, I will develop my idea.
On PF, all posts must be consistent with the professional scientific literature. Personal speculation is not permitted. Therefore this thread is closed.


If a photon (light) differs from an electron only in the direction of rotation,
It doesn’t. It also differs in mass, spin, and charge.

I may be wrong, but I think that this is the key to solving the existence of such a phenomenon as the "Solar Wind".
If you have specific non-speculative questions about the solar wind then please open a separate thread. Remember to ask questions about the current state of understanding and not provide your personal speculation.


Getting to the Earth, the flow of photons turns into a set of electrons (or protons). Why is this necessary? So that the Earth sits firmly in orbit.
This is a complete non-sequitor. Nothing about the flow of photons or solar wind particle’s stabilizes the earth’s orbit.


I understand that the Earth itself has a non-neutral charge, quite definite (positive or negative). But the charge can be lost (as with any battery).
Batteries don’t lose or gain charge, despite the common vernacular. They lose or gain chemical potential energy.

And the Sun "recharges" the Earth. That is, sunlight is not an abstract thing, but a mechanism for maintaining communication between the Sun and the planets of the Solar system.
Charge is also largely unrelated to communication.


Hence the explanation of the variability of solar radiation (periods of solar activity). When the Sun "feels" the weakening of the connection, it emits more light.
If you have questions about the variability of solar activity please ask in a separate thread without proposing such speculative mechanisms.


I would like to hear the opinion of respected physicists. Thanks.
Unfortunately, it is not positive at all. Thread closed.
 
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