Periodic electron motion in a perfect conductor using a semiclassical model

  • I
  • Thread starter dRic2
  • Start date
  • #1
dRic2
Gold Member
832
209
Summary:
Imagine to have a perfect conductor, i.e. no impurities and no thermal motion (0K)
According to the semiclassical approximation, in response to a constant electric field I would get a periodic motion of the electron, like this:
Schermata 2019-09-02 alle 17.28.01.png

The sinusoidal type function is the velocity, while the function that goes to infinity is the effective mass. Thus I was wondering, since ##v## also gets negative values, does it means that an electron oscillates back and forth ?

Thanks,
Ric
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #3
dRic2
Gold Member
832
209
Yes, this is called Bloch oscillations.

Thanks! Does the electron lose energy due to radiation emission ?
 
  • Like
Likes jim mcnamara and fluidistic
  • #4
fluidistic
Gold Member
3,782
137
Thanks! Does the electron lose energy due to radiation emission ?
Good question. I think not, because radiation is a surface phenomenon while we are considering a perfect crystal (and at 0 K), i.e. a bulk. But then it's very strange, because we have a time varying current (AC), but no radiation. I'm not sure what's going on.
 
  • #5
dRic2
Gold Member
832
209
Good question. I think not, because radiation is a surface phenomenon while we are considering a perfect crystal (and at 0 K), i.e. a bulk. But then it's very strange, because we have a time varying current (AC), but no radiation. I'm not sure what's going on.
That's reasonable. At least it is the only think I can think of... I am dumber than usual when it comes to radiation, but assuming that there is a continuous exchange of radiation between electrons in the bulk, wouldn't you expect a more complicated motion instead of simple oscillations ?
 
  • #6
fluidistic
Gold Member
3,782
137
That's reasonable. At least it is the only think I can think of... I am dumber than usual when it comes to radiation, but assuming that there is a continuous exchange of radiation between electrons in the bulk, wouldn't you expect a more complicated motion instead of simple oscillations ?
Yeah for sure. For one, Bloch oscillations are derived from the idependant electrons assumption.
 
  • #7
dRic2
Gold Member
832
209
Yeah for sure. For one, Bloch oscillations are derived from the idependant electrons assumption.
Then I find very surprising that they have been detected experimentally 😯😯
 

Related Threads on Periodic electron motion in a perfect conductor using a semiclassical model

Replies
6
Views
545
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
20
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
3K
Top