PhD Physics after engineering

In summary: What is the difference between a BSc in physics and a BSc in engineering?A BSc in physics is the equivalent of a high school diploma or a degree in physics, while a BSc in engineering is the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in engineering.
  • #1
I want to be a theoretical physicist on astronomy and have just passed out of school. To achieve my dream, I should get a degree in a Physics course (like B.Sc. Physics Hon.), followed by a Masters and then apply for PhD. I have also read that some students got a PhD in physics after completing their B.Tech. Is that possible? But, as the job opportunities are more in engineering than for a B.Sc. graduate, my parents have told me that I should choose engineering for my graduation. I live in India and research opportunities are very limited here. I can also go ahead with a dual degree of B.Tech and M.Tech in engineering. Pls answer accordingly.
 
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  • #2
androbada525 said:
I want to be a theoretical physicist on astronomy and have just passed out of school. To achieve my dream, I should get a degree in a Physics course (like B.Sc. Physics Hon.), followed by a Masters and then apply for PhD. I have also read that some students got a PhD in physics after completing their B.Tech. Is that possible? But, as the job opportunities are more in engineering than for a B.Sc. graduate, my parents have told me that I should choose engineering for my graduation. I live in India and research opportunities are very limited here. I can also go ahead with a dual degree of B.Tech and M.Tech in engineering. Pls answer accordingly.

Your post is extremely confusing!

What exactly do you wish to do after graduation?

If you are already pursuing an engineering degree because (i) of more job opportunities and (ii) your parents told you so, then how will this be any different after you get your degree?

Zz.
 
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  • #3
ZapperZ said:
Your post is extremely confusing!

What exactly do you wish to do after graduation?

If you are already pursuing an engineering degree because (i) of more job opportunities and (ii) your parents told you so, then how will this be any different after you get your degree?

Zz.

I am not pursuing any degree as of now. iI am yet to start going to college
As i mentioned in the first post, my goal is to become a theoretical physicist. I have read on this forum that some students were able to get a PhD in physics right after doing their engineering. So, as the combined number of years it will take me to get a B.Sc. and M.Sc. I am physics is more than the number of years it will take me to do engineering, my parents want me to save that time and do my PhD after B.Tech. I hope I am clear now. In India, we also have the opportunity to get a dual degree of B. Tech and M.Tech in 5 years. So, even if i take up the option of going for a dual degree, i will still save some time as the number of years taken to do B.Sc and M.Sc is more than the time taken to get a dual degree of B.Tech and M.Tech. My ultimate goal as i have mentioned is to become a theoretical physicist in astronomy. I have only mentioned the paths i can take to achieve my dream. My parents want the best for me, and hence, told me that i should pursue a degree in engineering because it will take lesser time than doing B.Sc and M.Sc. and the job opportunities are also better. So, maybe, i will be able to do my PhD from a better place. Again, i have only mentioned the paths I think I can take: B.Tech, B.Tech- M.Tech dual degree, B.Sc-M.Sc. . I intend to move out to foreign lands like US or UK to pursue research as the research opportunities are lesser in India. What i wish to know is what path i should take? I have only read that one can do a PhD in physics after B.Tech. I want to know, is it possible these days to get a masyers in physics if you have an engineering background? Secondly, i want to ask, are the degrees given by the Indian Universities recognized in foreign countries, so that I can pursue my PgD in foreign countries? Again, thanks for your time. I hope I was able to explain myself this time.

Regards.
 
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  • #4
This post is even more confusing.

Job opportunities are not better when you have a BSc in engineering AND a PhD in theoretical physics (if you can even get that combination).
Why? No one will hire you for a BSc engineering job because obviously your passion is not with that job.
And no one will hire you for a PhD position because you have a BSc in engineering vs one in physics, because all that matters is your PhD.
You have the same job opportunity as anyone else with a PhD in Theoretical Physics.

A BSc or MSc, physics or engineering, is the same length as long as they are both part of the same system (not Bologna vs Anglo-Saxon)

Saving time is not how you become a successful theoretical physicist.

Also, if there is truly a 5 year dual physics-engineering BSc-MSc programme, it isn't a true dual degree. You'll learn less about physics and less about engineering and you do just as much projects and research as anyone else.
 
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1. What is a PhD in Physics after engineering?

A PhD in Physics after engineering is an advanced research degree that prepares individuals for careers in academia, industry, or government. It involves conducting original research in a specific area of physics and writing a dissertation to present the findings.

2. What are the requirements for pursuing a PhD in Physics after engineering?

The specific requirements may vary depending on the university, but generally, a candidate must hold a bachelor's degree in engineering or a related field, have a strong background in physics, and demonstrate research potential through previous publications or projects.

3. How long does it take to complete a PhD in Physics after engineering?

The duration of a PhD program can range from 4-7 years, depending on the individual's progress and the nature of their research. Factors such as funding, research complexity, and publication requirements can also impact the length of the program.

4. What career opportunities are available with a PhD in Physics after engineering?

With a PhD in Physics after engineering, individuals can pursue careers in academia, research and development, government agencies, or industry. They can also work as consultants, science writers, or in other related fields.

5. Can I pursue a PhD in Physics after engineering without a master's degree?

Yes, some universities allow students to apply directly to a PhD program after completing a bachelor's degree. However, having a master's degree in a related field can provide a stronger foundation and may increase the chances of acceptance into a PhD program.

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