Photoelectric effect, and sunlight.

  • Thread starter kcajrenreb
  • Start date
  • #1
48
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello, I apologize if this question makes no sense, or is stupid, but I would just like to clarify something.

Is the light that comes from the sun a high enough intensity to "knock" any electrons out of the atoms in a metal? I know it is a high enough frequency, and I think the intensity is high enough, but I'd just like to make sure.

Thank you very much, and again I apologize if my question made little sense.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Drakkith
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
20,746
4,457
The photoelectric effect is independent of intensity. A single photon can knock an electron out of metal as long as the frequency is high enough, aka it has enough energy. Intensity merely causes MORE electrons to be knocked out per unit of time.
 
  • #3
10
0
Hello, I apologize if this question makes no sense, or is stupid, but I would just like to clarify something.

Is the light that comes from the sun a high enough intensity to "knock" any electrons out of the atoms in a metal? I know it is a high enough frequency, and I think the intensity is high enough, but I'd just like to make sure.

Thank you very much, and again I apologize if my question made little sense.
Visible light cant.
X-ray i think can knock out an electron of almost everything.
The problem is if they can get to your metal. most of UV and higher get blocked by the atmosphere.
 
  • #4
48
0
Really? I thought that blue light on the visible spectrum was a high enough frequency to "knock" the electrons out of metal, I guess I thought wrong. Thanks for your answers both of you.
 
  • #5
Drakkith
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
20,746
4,457
Really? I thought that blue light on the visible spectrum was a high enough frequency to "knock" the electrons out of metal, I guess I thought wrong. Thanks for your answers both of you.
From wikipedia:
When a surface is exposed to electromagnetic radiation above a certain threshold frequency (typically visible light for alkali metals, near ultraviolet for other metals, and extreme ultraviolet for non-metals), the radiation is absorbed and electrons are emitted. Light, and especially ultra-violet light, discharges negatively electrified bodies with the production of rays of the same nature as cathode rays.
The article is here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect
 

Related Threads on Photoelectric effect, and sunlight.

  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
21
Views
18K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
749
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
527
  • Last Post
Replies
22
Views
6K
Top