Physics Diagram Maker: Create Diagrams Easily

In summary, the conversation discusses various software options for creating diagrams of physics. The suggested programs include Xara, Dia, Xfig, OpenOffice Draw, Microsoft Paint, Asymptote, and VPython. Some desirable features for such software are the ability to group objects, provide computed positions and orientations, and have a portable and accepted standard format. The conversation also mentions the use of LaTeX-picture graphics and the possibility of PF supporting SVG.
  • #1
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I want a software by which I can make diagrams of physics.
thanks
 
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  • #2
I'd like a program like that also!
 
  • #3
What do you mean by "diagrams of physics"?
 
  • #4
I think he means the types of "scientific" drawings found in texts and such.
 
  • #5
I would recommend http://www.xara.com/products/xtreme/default.asp?v=std&t=" [Broken]. It covers graphics, drawing, and photos.
 
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  • #6
Xara has several very impressives examples. But I don't think it is suitable for any kind of diagram. You can try Dia or Xfig (if you are in Windows look for winfig). But if you want a software for drawing Feynman diagrams see https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=158996 thread, the last post indicate a platform independent software :cool:
 
  • #7
Those are nice. Since I'm going to college this fall, this will be handy.
 
  • #8
How complicated do you need the drawings to be? If you just need to draw simple free-body diagrams and stuff like that, the drawing tools in Word are more than sufficient.
 
  • #9
If you're depriving Bill of a few dollars by using OpenOffice instead of MS Office then you already have OpenOffice Draw that may be good enough for many uses. It has a number of shapes, connectors and symbols that are easy to use, more around, edit...
 
  • #10
I want a software by which such diagrams can be created.Samples are given below.
 

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  • #11
Some more samples are given.
 

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  • #13
I've done more complicated drawings than those for journal publications, all using Powerpoint! I have also used Visio, which has many built-in 'stencils'.

You don't need anything more involved if most of your figures are blocks, lines, and simple curves.

Zz.
 
  • #15
I use microsoft paint for all of my diagram needs
 
  • #16
For technical drawings, I usually prefer a vector-based (rather than raster-based) approach. They scale better and are often easier to modify and reuse. (I, too, have prepared some poster presentations using the drawing tools in Word and Excel.)
For me, some desirable features are:
- the grouping of primitives to, e.g., make a "schematic resistor", which can scaled and rotated as a single object.
- the ability to provide computed positions and orientations (so that a computer program can generate the figure).
- portability and nonreliance on a particular software package
- an accepted standard... like postscript or svg or LaTeX-picture
- human-readable format for manual editing

Some tools that I've played around with
http://jpicedt.sourceforge.net/site/index.php?section=overview&page=snapshots
http://xfig.org/userman/
http://www.inkscape.org/

http://vpython.org ...which is "physics-oriented" and which looks good on the screen... but I've been looking for a way to have it produce a vector-based output from its OpenGL display.
http://www.math.ubc.ca/~cass/graphics/manual/ and http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/hobby/MetaPost.html look interestingBy the way, it might be nice if PF supported SVG.
I have had to play around with LaTeX-picture graphics to do diagrams like
https://www.physicsforums.com/showpost.php?p=261562&postcount=300
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?p=935342#post935342
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?p=968227#post968227 (scroll down..., converted from Maple postcript)

Interesting reading on SVG and other vector formats from a mathematician's viewpoint: http://www.maa.org/editorial/mathgames/mathgames_08_01_05.html [Broken]
 
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What is Physics Diagram Maker?

Physics Diagram Maker is a software tool that allows scientists and students to easily create diagrams and illustrations related to physics concepts. It offers a user-friendly interface and a variety of editing and formatting options to help create professional-looking diagrams.

What types of diagrams can be created using Physics Diagram Maker?

Physics Diagram Maker offers a wide range of diagram types, including circuit diagrams, free body diagrams, energy diagrams, and motion diagrams. It also allows for the creation of custom diagrams for more specific or complex concepts.

Is Physics Diagram Maker suitable for all levels of physics knowledge?

Yes, Physics Diagram Maker is designed to be user-friendly and accessible for both beginners and experts in the field of physics. Its intuitive interface and helpful features make it easy for anyone to create professional-looking diagrams, regardless of their level of knowledge.

Can diagrams created with Physics Diagram Maker be exported?

Yes, diagrams can be exported in various file formats, such as JPEG, PNG, and PDF. This allows for easy sharing and printing of diagrams for presentations, reports, or other purposes.

Is Physics Diagram Maker compatible with all devices?

Physics Diagram Maker is a web-based tool, so it can be accessed from any device with an internet connection. It is compatible with both desktop and mobile devices, making it convenient for users to create diagrams on the go.

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