Picking Electives for a Career in NASA: Physics vs Maths

In summary, if your interests lie in working for NASA as an AE/ME and designing robots, spaceships, satellites, or rockets, systems theory would be more useful for you compared to courses in microelectronics. While a course in electronics may be beneficial, systems theory will have a greater impact on your career goals.
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I will get to pick some non ME electives corresponding to a semesters coursework, and my interests lies in these fields. Which will be more useful? I know the former is more physics focused and the other is more hardcore maths. I want to work for NASA after college, building or designing robots/spaceships/satellites/rockets.
 
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For what you're interested in, and I'm basing this off of what you mentioned in your other thread, systems theory will be more useful for you as an AE/ME. It won't hurt to have a course in electronics, but I don't think taking courses in microelectronics is going to have more benefit than systems theory if you want to be an Aerospace/Mechanical engineer at NASA.
 
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Both physics and mathematics are essential fields for a career in NASA, as they are both heavily involved in the design and development of robots, spaceships, satellites, and rockets. It is important to have a strong foundation in both subjects in order to excel in this field.

Physics will provide you with a fundamental understanding of the laws of nature and how they apply to the world around us. This knowledge is crucial in designing and building any type of spacecraft or technology that will be used in space. Physics also involves a lot of hands-on experimentation and problem-solving, which are important skills for any engineer or scientist working at NASA.

On the other hand, mathematics is the language of science and engineering. It is used to model and analyze complex systems and make predictions about their behavior. In the field of robotics and spacecraft design, mathematics is used to calculate trajectories, design control systems, and optimize performance. A strong background in mathematics will be beneficial in understanding and applying these principles in your work at NASA.

In conclusion, both physics and mathematics are important and complementary fields for a career in NASA. I would recommend taking electives in both subjects to gain a well-rounded understanding of the principles and concepts that are necessary for success in this field. Ultimately, your passion and dedication to your chosen field will be the most important factor in your success at NASA.
 

1. What is the difference between studying physics and mathematics for a career in NASA?

Both physics and mathematics are important fields for a career in NASA. Physics is the study of the natural world and how it works, while mathematics is the study of numbers, quantities, and shapes. In NASA, physics is used to understand the laws of the universe and how objects move in space, while mathematics is used to calculate and model complex systems and solve problems related to space exploration. So, while both are important, the focus of each field is slightly different.

2. Can I study both physics and mathematics for a career in NASA?

Yes, it is possible to study both physics and mathematics for a career in NASA. In fact, having a strong understanding of both fields can be beneficial, as they often overlap in many areas. Many NASA scientists and engineers have a background in both physics and mathematics.

3. Which field should I focus on if I want to work in NASA's space exploration missions?

If you are interested in working on NASA's space exploration missions, it is important to have a strong foundation in both physics and mathematics. However, depending on the specific role you are interested in, one field may be more relevant than the other. For example, if you want to design spacecraft, a background in physics may be more useful, while if you are interested in analyzing data from space probes, a background in mathematics may be more helpful.

4. Are there any specific courses I should take to prepare for a career in NASA?

There are no specific courses that are required for a career in NASA, but it is recommended to take courses in physics, mathematics, and engineering. Additionally, courses in computer science and programming can be beneficial, as many NASA projects involve the use of computer simulations and data analysis.

5. What other skills and qualities are important for a career in NASA?

In addition to a strong background in physics and mathematics, other skills and qualities that are important for a career in NASA include critical thinking, problem-solving, attention to detail, teamwork, and communication. It is also important to have a passion for space exploration and a willingness to constantly learn and adapt to new technologies and discoveries.

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