Pneumatic Lift Problem

In summary: sorry if that's not correct), so you could use that to find the density of air at a given pressure and temperature.
  • #1
4
0

Homework Statement


A pneumatic lift system is being demonstrated at a sales show. The total load is 70 kg, and the lift piston is 15.2 cm in diameter and has a 20.2 cm stroke. A portable air bottle with an initial pressure of 20 MPa and a temperature of 23 Celsius degrees is to be used as the pneumatic supply. A regulator reduces the pressure from the bottle to the lift system. Neglecting all volume in the lines from the bottle to the piston, determine the number of times the piston can operate per air bottle if the air in the bottle remains at 23 celsius degrees and the volume of the bottle is 0.05 m3

Homework Equations


P = F/A
PV = mRT
M = ρ v
V = πr2 h
A = 2πrh + 2πr2

The Attempt at a Solution


V = π (0.076)2 x 0.202
V = 0.0036m3

A = 2 π 0.076 x 0.202 + 2π(0.076)2
A = 0.13m2

P = 70 x 9.81 / 0.13 + Patm
Pcyl = 106607.61 Pa

mair = 1.225 x 0.0036
mair = 0.0049 kg

Finding mass of air in bottle

PV = mRT
2000x103 x 0.05 = m x 0.287x103 x 296
m bot= 1.18kg

mbot / mair = 240 lifts.
I am unsure if that is the correct step to take, I feel as though i am missing something obvious.
 
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  • #2
TonyBoyle said:

Homework Statement


A pneumatic lift system is being demonstrated at a sales show. The total load is 70 kg, and the lift piston is 15.2 cm in diameter and has a 20.2 cm stroke. A portable air bottle with an initial pressure of 20 MPa and a temperature of 23 Celsius degrees is to be used as the pneumatic supply. A regulator reduces the pressure from the bottle to the lift system. Neglecting all volume in the lines from the bottle to the piston, determine the number of times the piston can operate per air bottle if the air in the bottle remains at 23 celsius degrees and the volume of the bottle is 0.05 m3

Homework Equations


P = F/A
PV = mRT
M = ρ v
V = πr2 h
A = 2πrh + 2πr2
The surface area of the pneumatic cylinder is not what's important.
It's the area of the piston in the cylinder on which the pressure acts to move it up and down that's important.

The Attempt at a Solution


V = π (0.076)2 x 0.202
V = 0.0036m3

A = 2 π 0.076 x 0.202 + 2π(0.076)2
A = 0.13m2
Wrong area calculation. See comment above.
P = 70 x 9.81 / 0.13 + Patm
Pcyl = 106607.61 Pa

mair = 1.225 x 0.0036
mair = 0.0049 kg

Finding mass of air in bottle

PV = mRT
2000x103 x 0.05 = m x 0.287x103 x 296
m bot= 1.18kg

mbot / mair = 240 lifts.
I am unsure if that is the correct step to take, I feel as though i am missing something obvious.
Yes, you don't know how a pneumatic cylinder works.
 
  • #3
I see thank you for your help.
I calculated the area of the piston to be 0.018m2 which gave me a new value of Absolute pressure as 139.48kPa.
Would I be correct in using the density of the air in the cylinder as 1.225kg/m3 as looking back I do not think this is correct.
I think I have to calculate the temperature inside of the cylinder to be able to us PV=mRT to calculate the mass of air but I am unsure as to how I would go about this, any input would be extremely helpful.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
TonyBoyle said:
I see thank you for your help.
I calculated the area of the piston to be 0.018m2 which gave me a new value of Absolute pressure as 139.48kPa.
Would I be correct in using the density of the air in the cylinder as 1.225kg/m3 as looking back I do not think this is correct.
I think I have to calculate the temperature inside of the cylinder to be able to us PV=mRT to calculate the mass of air but I am unsure as to how I would go about this, any input would be extremely helpful.
It takes a certain amount of pressure to support and lift 70 kg with the piston in the cylinder.

The density of air within the cylinder is going to depend on this pressure.
 
  • #5
Thank you again for your help, although I cannot think of a way to calculate the density of the air without knowing the mass of it inside of the cylinder.
Again sorry if I am missing something very obvious here.
 
  • #6
TonyBoyle said:
Thank you again for your help, although I cannot think of a way to calculate the density of the air without knowing the mass of it inside of the cylinder.
Again sorry if I am missing something very obvious here.
You don't have to necessarily use the properties of the cylinder in order to find the density of the air at a given pressure and temperature.

You have the ideal gas law, PV = nRT (I'm using n for the number of moles here as opposed to m for mass), which can be re-arranged into a relation to give density.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ideal_gas_law
 
  • #7
I rearranged to ρ = P / RT but would the density not differ when the air is in the cylinder?
Or is the temperature of the air inside of the cylinder the same as the temperature in the tank?
 
  • #8
TonyBoyle said:
I rearranged to ρ = P / RT but would the density not differ when the air is in the cylinder?
Or is the temperature of the air inside of the cylinder the same as the temperature in the tank?
The density of the air depends only on the pressure and the temperature. You need a certain minimum pressure in the cylinder to support and lift 70 kg.

The regulator on the portable bottle reduces the pressure of the air going to the cylinder. I think you can consider the temperature of the air in the portable bottle to be the same in the cylinder.
 

1. What is a pneumatic lift problem?

A pneumatic lift problem refers to a scenario in which there is an issue with a pneumatic lift system, which uses compressed air to move objects or people. This could include malfunctions, leaks, or other technical difficulties that impede the proper functioning of the lift.

2. What causes pneumatic lift problems?

Pneumatic lift problems can be caused by a variety of factors, such as wear and tear on the system, faulty components, improper maintenance, or environmental conditions like extreme temperatures or moisture. Human error and misuse can also contribute to lift problems.

3. How are pneumatic lift problems diagnosed?

Diagnosing a pneumatic lift problem involves a thorough inspection of the system and its components. This may include checking for leaks, testing pressure levels, and examining the condition of valves, hoses, and other parts. In some cases, specialized tools or equipment may be required for diagnosis.

4. Can pneumatic lift problems be fixed?

In most cases, pneumatic lift problems can be fixed. The specific solution will depend on the cause of the problem. For example, if there is a leak, it may be possible to repair or replace the affected part. In more severe cases, the entire system may need to be replaced.

5. How can pneumatic lift problems be prevented?

Preventing pneumatic lift problems involves regular maintenance and upkeep of the system. This may include checking for leaks, cleaning and lubricating components, and replacing worn or damaged parts. Proper training for users can also help prevent human error and misuse of the lift.

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