Prerequisites for Medical Physics M.S?

In summary, the individual was originally interested in pursuing a B.S in Physics and then moving on to grad school. However, due to concerns about job prospects, they switched to a B.S in Computational Physics. They are now considering a Medical Physics M.S/PhD program at their university, but are unsure if their background in Computational Physics is sufficient for this field. The individual is also questioning whether they should take additional courses in Chemistry and Biology. While each program may have its own requirements, generally a background in computational physics should be suitable for transitioning into medical physics. Taking additional courses in biology and chemistry may be beneficial, but not necessary.
  • #1
malignant
42
1
I was originally interested in doing a B.S in Physics then going to grad school for Physics. After a while of stressing over the job outlook I switched to a B.S in Computational Physics and was going to continue on to grad school for physics that way I have programming to fall back on.

I saw that my university had a CAMPEP approved Medical Physics M.S/PhD program which seems interesting. It's spring break so I can't find out much about it yet but if anyone here has experience with the field, I'm wondering if it's OK to go from a Computational Physics B.S to the Medical Physics M.S program? Instead of starting with a normal Physics B.S. The difference is mainly that the Computational Physics B.S would only have for example one course in Intermediate Mechanics, E&M, and Quantum Mechanics instead of two of each. It also lacks 2 or 3 additional Physics electives that the Physics B.S has. In place of those are Computer Science(4-5 courses) and either 2 courses in Computational Physics or Numerical Analysis.

I'm confused because it seems to me that it would require a decent amount of Chemistry and Biology but the undergraduate programs include at most two Chemistry courses and no Biology. (Physics B.S has two Chemistry courses but Computational Physics B.S has none)


Basically, is a Computational Physics B.S all right for transitioning into Medical Physics? And also should I be taking more Chemistry?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Each medical physics program has it's own unique entrance requirements, but generally speaking you should be fine with a "computational physics" background.

You don't "need" to have taken a biology course, but I think doing at least first year biology can be a substantial help in understanding basic radiobiology. Similar with chemistry. You might want to try squeezing that second E&M course in too, but there are a lot of courses that can help you tool A lot of your computational physics courses could in fact be invaluable, depending on the projects that you take on.
 

Related to Prerequisites for Medical Physics M.S?

1. What is the required educational background for a Medical Physics M.S. program?

The typical prerequisite for a Medical Physics M.S. program is a Bachelor's degree in a related field such as physics, engineering, or mathematics. Some programs may also require specific coursework in biology, chemistry, and/or anatomy.

2. Is prior research experience necessary for admission to a Medical Physics M.S. program?

While prior research experience is not always a requirement for admission, it is highly valued by many programs. Research experience demonstrates a strong interest and aptitude for scientific inquiry, which is essential for success in a Medical Physics M.S. program.

3. Are there any specific standardized tests required for admission to a Medical Physics M.S. program?

Many Medical Physics M.S. programs require applicants to submit scores from the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) general test. Some programs may also require the GRE subject test in physics. However, each program may have different requirements, so it is important to research the specific admissions requirements for each program you are interested in.

4. Do I need to have a background in healthcare to be accepted into a Medical Physics M.S. program?

No, a background in healthcare is not a prerequisite for admission to a Medical Physics M.S. program. However, some programs may require applicants to have completed certain healthcare-related courses or have relevant work experience in the healthcare field.

5. Can I apply to a Medical Physics M.S. program if I do not have a background in physics?

While a background in physics is preferred, it is not always a requirement for admission to a Medical Physics M.S. program. Some programs may accept applicants with a strong background in related fields such as engineering or mathematics. However, it is important to review the specific admissions requirements for each program to determine if your background meets their criteria.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
28
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
29
Views
843
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
400
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
999
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
26
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
1K
Back
Top