Pressure vessel test chamber problem

In summary, the conversation discusses the design of a safe chamber for pressure testing small vessels. The vessels range in capacity and are tested at a specific pressure. The design includes a thick-walled tube with welded end caps and an opening door. The speaker is seeking guidance on calculating the impact force on the containment wall in case of a catastrophic failure. They also mention the use of compressed air and the distance to the container wall. The conversation concludes with the mention of basic stress calculations using the conservation of momentum and F=ma.
  • #1
David Fyffe
1
0
I have to design a chamber where a range of small pressure vessels can be safely pressure tested. They range up to around 10 litres in capacity and are tested at 45 barg. The vessel is a thick wall tube with two domed end caps welded construction. I would like some guidance on how to calculate the effect of a catastrophic failure should an end cap weld fail. What would the impact force be on the containment wall. The container is to be a box form with an opening door. I need to establish the wall strength required. I considered that this would be the worst case scenario as leaks would not not eject material. The vessel is to be held in a fixture during the pressure test. The test will use compressed air only. The distance to the container wall is likely to be around 300mm or less. I would appreciate some not too complicated formulas or guidance.

I have been involved in pressure vessel design in the past and can do some basic stress calcs.

David
 
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  • #2
If you know the force pushing on the end cap and the mass of it.You should be able to use the conservation of momentum and F=ma to calculate the force on the containment.
 
  • #3
,

Thank you for reaching out for guidance on your pressure vessel test chamber design. It is important to carefully consider the potential risks and hazards associated with pressure testing and ensure that your design can safely contain any potential failures.

To calculate the impact force on the containment wall, we can use the formula F = P x A, where F is the force, P is the pressure, and A is the area. In this case, the pressure is 45 barg and the area can be calculated using the formula for the surface area of a cylinder (2πrh + 2πr^2, where r is the radius and h is the height). This will give you the total force exerted on the containment wall in the event of a catastrophic failure.

To determine the wall strength required, you will need to consider the material properties of the chamber and the maximum stress it can withstand before failing. This will require some more detailed stress calculations, taking into account the thickness of the walls and the welds. You may also want to consider incorporating safety factors into your calculations to ensure an extra margin of safety.

In addition to the structural design, it is important to also consider the potential hazards of the compressed air used in the pressure test. Make sure that all necessary safety measures, such as pressure relief valves, are in place to prevent over-pressurization of the chamber.

Lastly, I would recommend consulting with a licensed engineer or pressure vessel specialist to review your design and calculations. They can provide more detailed and accurate guidance specific to your project.

I hope this helps and wish you success in your pressure vessel test chamber design. Safety should always be the top priority in any scientific endeavor. Good luck!
 

Related to Pressure vessel test chamber problem

1. What is a pressure vessel test chamber?

A pressure vessel test chamber is a sealed container used to test the strength and durability of materials, components, or products under high pressure conditions.

2. Why is a pressure vessel test chamber important?

A pressure vessel test chamber is important because it allows scientists to simulate real-world conditions and evaluate the performance and safety of materials and products under high pressure environments.

3. How is a pressure vessel test chamber designed and built?

A pressure vessel test chamber is typically designed and built by engineers who specialize in pressure vessel design. They consider factors such as material selection, wall thickness, and structural integrity to ensure the chamber can withstand the desired pressure levels.

4. What types of materials can be tested in a pressure vessel test chamber?

A wide range of materials can be tested in a pressure vessel test chamber, including metals, plastics, ceramics, and composites. Products such as pipes, tanks, valves, and structural components can also be tested.

5. What safety precautions should be taken when using a pressure vessel test chamber?

When using a pressure vessel test chamber, it is important to follow all safety protocols and guidelines to prevent accidents or injuries. This may include wearing protective gear, conducting regular maintenance and inspections, and monitoring pressure levels closely during testing.

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