Print ViewA Ball Hits a Wall Elastically

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DeltatIn summary, a ball with mass m and initial velocity v_i_vec strikes a vertical wall at an angle of theta_i. The collision is completely elastic, with negligible friction and a duration of Deltat. The force exerted on the ball by the wall is parallel to the x axis. In Part A, the final angle theta_f that the ball's velocity vector makes with the negative y axis is equal to theta_i. In Part B, the magnitude F of the average force exerted on the ball by the wall can be calculated using the formula 2*m*v_ix*cos(theta_i)/Deltat.
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kenau_reveas
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A ball of mass m moving with velocity v_i_vec strikes a vertical wall. View Figure The angle between the ball's initial velocity vector and the wall is theta_i as shown on the diagram, which depicts the situation as seen from above. The duration of the collision between the ball and the wall is Deltat, and this collision is completely elastic. Friction is negligible, so the ball does not start spinning. In this idealized collision, the force exerted on the ball by the wall is parallel to the x axis.

Part A
What is the final angle theta_f that the ball's velocity vector makes with the negative y axis?
Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction.

theta_f = theta_i

Part B

What is the magnitude F of the average force exerted on the ball by the wall?
Express your answer in terms of variables given in the problem introduction and/or v_ix.
 

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What have you done to try to solve this problem?
 
  • #3
What is the answer for part b?

oh, i found 2*m*v_ix
 
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Related to Print ViewA Ball Hits a Wall Elastically

1. What is an elastic collision?

An elastic collision is a type of collision between two objects where there is no loss of kinetic energy. This means that the total kinetic energy of the objects before the collision is equal to the total kinetic energy after the collision.

2. How does a ball hitting a wall elastically differ from an inelastic collision?

In an elastic collision, the objects involved bounce off each other without any loss of kinetic energy. In an inelastic collision, some of the kinetic energy is converted into other forms, such as heat or sound. In the case of a ball hitting a wall elastically, the ball will bounce back with the same amount of kinetic energy it had before the collision.

3. What factors affect the elasticity of a collision between a ball and a wall?

The elasticity of a collision between a ball and a wall can be affected by factors such as the material and surface of the ball and the wall, the speed and angle of the ball's approach, and any external forces acting on the ball during the collision.

4. How is the coefficient of restitution related to an elastic collision?

The coefficient of restitution is a measure of how bouncy an object is. In an elastic collision, the coefficient of restitution is equal to 1, meaning the object bounces back with the same speed it had before the collision. This value is used to calculate the final velocities of objects in an elastic collision.

5. Can a ball hitting a wall ever have a perfectly elastic collision?

In theory, yes, a ball hitting a wall could have a perfectly elastic collision. However, in real-world situations, there are always external factors that can affect the elasticity of the collision, such as air resistance or imperfections in the surface of the ball or wall. Therefore, a perfectly elastic collision is rare in practical applications.

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