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Aerospace Prithvi-II fails to take off in user trial

  1. Sep 24, 2010 #1
    [PLAIN]http://en.rian.ru/images/16070/97/160709799.jpg [Broken]

    why is nosecone detaching at such a low altitude
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 24, 2010 #2
    most likely that is where the expensive payload is - and they don't want that going kaboom with the rest of the rocket! :biggrin:
     
  4. Sep 24, 2010 #3

    jhae2.718

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    If I recall correctly, it's a launch abort system that jettisons the capsule for recovery in the event of launch failure.
     
  5. Sep 24, 2010 #4
    Hmmm, that's sort of odd in my opinion....seeing that Prithvi II is a freakin' ballistic nuclear missile. That nose-cone thingy would be the nuclear warhead. :confused:
     
  6. Sep 24, 2010 #5

    jhae2.718

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    Wasn't sure what kind of rocket it was; just trying to give a general answer (goes to show what happens when you make assumptions). That would be rather odd for a ballistic missile to have such a mechanism.

    Perhaps for the test it's some kind of instrumentation package? (I'd certainly hope they didn't have a warhead onboard!)
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  7. Sep 24, 2010 #6
    You're probably right about that. Probably didn't want to lose their telemetry gear :).
     
  8. Sep 24, 2010 #7
    I can imagine the guidance system (if its in there), is not cheap.
     
  9. Sep 25, 2010 #8
    It's not an ICBM. It's a theater missile capable of a 1,000 kg warhead. The Prithvi II range is just 350 km. Whether that warhead is nuclear or something else is up to India, though there are far cheaper ways of delivering 1,000 kg payloads...

    It's principle advantage, courtesy of its significantly-sized wings, is it's ability to defeat anti-ballistic missiles.
     
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