Progression of Time & Entropy: Is the Pass. Slowing?

In summary: That's right, entropy is a necessary ingredient for time to exist.Entropy is a necessary ingredient for time to exist.
  • #1
The directionality of time seems to be linked to the process of increasing disorder.

Is the 'passage' of time similarly linked?

If so, it would seem that the passage of time would generally slow down as the universe cools. And perhaps time should pass more slowly in cooler regions of the cosmos; and pass more quickly during times of rapid expansion.

And, if true, could we even experience or measure it since our senses and instruments would be in sync with what we were trying to measure...unless we were looking into deep space...
 
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  • #2
Paul Howard A said:
The directionality of time seems to be linked to the process of increasing disorder.

More precisely, this is one of several possible "arrows of time", the thermodynamic one. There is also a cosmological arrow (the "future" is the direction in which the universe is expanding) and the memory arrow (the "past" is the direction of time in which we can remember events, so the "future" is the other one). There are arguments for why two or even all three of these arrows must point in the same direction, but I don't think the question is settled.

Paul Howard A said:
Is the 'passage' of time similarly linked?

No, assuming that by "passage" you mean the "rate" at which time passes. The passage of time can be measured by periodic processes that are reversible and involve no entropy change, so there is no way to link the "rate of time flow" to entropy.
 
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  • #3
PeterDonis said:
The passage of time can be measured by periodic processes that are reversible and involve no entropy change

Surely something must be changing to measure time. The clock must increment or the observer must accumulate memories of the past- these processes would involve entropy?
 
  • #4
Cause and effect are the arrow of time.
 
  • #5
bcrelling said:
Surely something must be changing to measure time. The clock must increment or the observer must accumulate memories of the past- these processes would involve entropy?

Good point. The recording of the passage of time does require some entropy increase. However, the periodicity of the process being recorded is not affected by the increase in entropy. So the "tick rate" of the clock would not change as entropy increases. So this inference in the OP...

Paul Howard A said:
it would seem that the passage of time would generally slow down as the universe cools

...is not correct.
 
  • #6
PeterDonis said:
The passage of time can be measured by periodic processes that are reversible and involve no entropy change, so there is no way to link the "rate of time flow" to entropy.

What periodic process (other than a perpetual motion machine) involves no transfer of energy? (ie entropy change)
 
  • #7
Paul Howard A said:
What periodic process (other than a perpetual motion machine) involves no transfer of energy? (ie entropy change)

Two clocks may keep the same time even though their mechanisms do different amounts of work in different ways ( steam vs wind-power say ).
 
  • #8
Doug Huffman said:
Cause and effect are the arrow of time.
Paul Howard A said:
What periodic process (other than a perpetual motion machine) involves no transfer of energy? (ie entropy change)

gravity; (coordinate acceleration) and certainly requires spacetime.

I'd say Doug has it most "right" if we're to paint a geometric property as something of a "passing". It's via that "odd" geometric property that the properties of physical "entities" can "play out"...tick tick tick
 
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1. What is the concept of time progression and entropy?

Time progression is the idea that time moves forward in a linear fashion, with events occurring one after the other. Entropy is a measure of the disorder or randomness in a system. In the context of the universe, entropy is often seen as a measure of the amount of energy that is no longer available to do work.

2. How does time progression affect entropy?

As time progresses, entropy naturally increases. This is due to the fact that energy is constantly being used and converted into forms that are no longer usable. As more and more energy is lost, the level of disorder in the universe increases, resulting in an increase in entropy.

3. Is the progression of time slowing down?

According to the laws of thermodynamics, time progression and entropy will continue to increase until the universe reaches a state of maximum entropy, also known as the "heat death" of the universe. However, this process is happening at a very slow rate, and it is not expected to significantly affect our daily lives.

4. Are there any factors that can slow down time progression and entropy?

While the overall progression of time and entropy cannot be stopped, there are some situations where it may appear to slow down. For example, in a closed system where no energy is being added or lost, entropy will remain constant. Additionally, the presence of a powerful force, such as gravity, can temporarily slow down the progression of time.

5. Can we reverse the progression of time and entropy?

Currently, there is no known way to reverse the progression of time and entropy. In fact, the second law of thermodynamics states that entropy can never decrease in a closed system. Some theories suggest that it may be possible to reverse the progression of time in certain situations, but this is still speculative and has not been proven.

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