Question of units of B, H in Gaussian system

  • Thread starter Master J
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  • #1
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In "Classical Theory of Fields", by Landau & Lifgarbagez, they give, for example, the force on a charged particle by a magnetic field as:

F = [itex]\frac{ev}{c}[/itex] x H

where H is the magnetic field intensity. Now, normally written in SI units, this expression would use B and no factor of 1/c.

So how are B and H related here? I'm a bit confused over the units in use (which I think may be Gaussian)!
 

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  • #2
Meir Achuz
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In Gaussian units, B and H have the same units (gauss), and are identical in free space.
For sonme historical reason (and a bit of confusion) H was originally given the unit 'Oersted' with 1 Oersted = 1 Gauss.
 
  • #3
Meir Achuz
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In Gaussian units, B and H have the same units (gauss), and are identical in free space.
For some historical reason (and a bit of confusion) H was originally given the unit 'Oersted' with 1 Oersted = 1 Gauss.
 
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So in Gaussian units, B and H are entirely interchangeable?
 
  • #5
Bill_K
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In Gaussian units, B and H have the same units (gauss), and are identical in free space.
 

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