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Radial and transeverse acceleration

  1. Jan 1, 2014 #1
    Particle is travelling along a plane smooth curve.At any point an acceleration is
    1 . Resultant of radial and transeverse components?
    2. Resultant of tangential and normal components?
    Are both 1 and 2 valid?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 2, 2014 #2

    tiny-tim

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    hi gianeshwar! :wink:

    tell us what you think, and why, and then we'll comment! :smile:
     
  4. Jan 2, 2014 #3
    Not only are they valid, but they are both the same thing: normal = radial, and tangential = transverse.
     
  5. Jan 2, 2014 #4

    tiny-tim

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    no, i think "radial" in this case is from the origin :wink:
     
  6. Jan 2, 2014 #5
    Normal and tangential are directions in the Frenet-Serret frame. Radial and transverse are directions in the polar coordinate frame. They coincide identically only when the curve is a circle about the polar system's origin.
     
  7. Jan 2, 2014 #6
    I guess I learned something new. I've never heard of transverse used for polar coordinates. I would have called it circumferential. Go figure.

    Chet
     
  8. Jan 2, 2014 #7
    I think it is also called azimuthal. There is also confusion about centripetal, whether it is "radial" or "normal". I have been confused myself :)
     
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