Rare earth magnet for solenoid core

In summary, the conversation discusses the design of a water valve using a solenoid coil and a rare Earth magnet. The magnet is used to provide more force for less current, but there is a question about the effectiveness of using a magnet compared to a standard ferrous material. The conversation also touches on the polarity of the magnet and how it can be used to remagnetize it.
  • #1
JakesSA
1
0
Hi,

I am trying to design a simple water valve that opens a plug in a small water reservoir until its empty.
So far I have a solenoid coil wound around a hollow core plastic pipe with a cylindrical rare Earth magnet inserted halfway into the pipe with a 'plug' attached to the top of the other half. Switch power on and the magnet pops out lifting the plug allowing water to flow around the magnet core through the pipe. Total movement of the core is restricted by a string attached to the bottom of magnet and plastic pipe. After power shut off the plug just falls back into place sealing the reservoir.

Since everyone else seems to use a standard ferrous material for the movable core, is there actually any point in using a magnet here?

Thanks in advance ..

EDIT: I used the rare Earth magnet in the hopes of obtaining more force for less current ..
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
If you put an soft Iron core in a solenoid, it will tend to pull inwards to the center of the solenoid when you apply power.

Using a magnet does allow you to get movement out of the coil instead of into it, if you get the polarity right.

That is also how you remagnetize the magnet, so starting off with a very strong magnet will make this less likely.
 
  • #3


Hello,

Your design for a water valve using a rare earth magnet for the solenoid core sounds interesting. Rare earth magnets are known for their strong magnetic properties, so it is possible that using one in your design could provide more force for less current compared to a standard ferrous material. However, it is important to consider the overall efficiency and cost-effectiveness of using a rare earth magnet in this application.

Rare earth magnets are generally more expensive than standard ferrous materials, so it is important to weigh the benefits of using a rare earth magnet versus the added cost. Additionally, rare earth magnets are also more brittle and can be easily damaged if not handled carefully. It is also important to consider the strength and durability of the magnet over time, as it may weaken with repeated use.

Overall, while using a rare earth magnet may provide more force for less current, it is important to carefully consider the cost and potential drawbacks before implementing it in your design. It may be beneficial to do some further research and experimentation to determine if a rare earth magnet is the best option for your specific application.
 

1. What is a rare earth magnet and how is it different from other magnets?

A rare earth magnet is a type of permanent magnet that is made from alloys of rare earth elements, such as neodymium, samarium, and dysprosium. These magnets are significantly stronger than traditional magnets, making them ideal for use in various applications.

2. How are rare earth magnets used in solenoid cores?

Rare earth magnets are commonly used in solenoid cores as they have a high magnetic flux density, meaning they can generate a strong magnetic field. This is essential for the efficient operation of solenoid cores, which are used in many electronic devices, such as electric motors and relays.

3. What are the advantages of using rare earth magnets in solenoid cores?

The main advantage of using rare earth magnets in solenoid cores is their strong magnetic field, which allows for more efficient and powerful operation of the device. They also have a high coercivity, meaning they are less susceptible to demagnetization, making them more durable and long-lasting.

4. Are there any safety concerns with rare earth magnets in solenoid cores?

Yes, there are some safety concerns with rare earth magnets in solenoid cores. These magnets are extremely strong, and if not handled properly, they can cause serious injuries, such as pinching or crushing of fingers. It is important to handle rare earth magnets with caution and keep them away from electronic devices, credit cards, and pacemakers.

5. Can rare earth magnets be recycled?

Yes, rare earth magnets can be recycled. However, the process is complex and expensive, making it more practical to reuse or repurpose the magnets instead. Many electronics manufacturers have implemented recycling programs to properly dispose of rare earth magnets and other electronic components.

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