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Homework Help: Rectangular to Polar Conversion

  1. Jul 10, 2011 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    I need to convert this to polar form; anyone have any ideas where to start?

    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution


    I know this is incorrect but Im a bit overwelmed on this one.

    any help would be wonderful! thanks!
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 10, 2011 #2

    SammyS

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    You didn't include r when substituting for x & y on the right hand side of the equation.

    Simplify (r2)3 by combining exponents. (Do this by using the properties of exponents.)
     
  4. Jul 10, 2011 #3
    did i do the substitutions right on the right side of the equation? or do i need to do some other manipulation of my relevant equations?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2011
  5. Jul 10, 2011 #4

    SammyS

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    Regarding the right hand side:
    If x = r*cos(θ), then what is x2 ? Similar question for y.​

    r5 is wrong too.
    (am)n = am*n , not am+n.​
     
  6. Jul 10, 2011 #5
    Is there a standard form it needs to be in?

    Should i try an simplify it further?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2011
  7. Jul 10, 2011 #6
    There's another simple step to simplify it further. What can you factor out of the right hand side that might allow for some cancelling?
     
  8. Jul 10, 2011 #7

    SammyS

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    On the right hand side you can do the squaring. For instance:
    (r*cos(θ))2 = r2*cos2(θ)​
    A similar result holds for the other term. Then, factor out 2*r2. Then, divide both sides by r2. Then there is a double angle identity on the right side.
     
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