Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Relativity and Photon Emission

  1. Mar 15, 2015 #1
    Consider another situation where electron A accelerates past stationary electron B. However. from the perspective of electron A, Electron B appears to be accelerating, does this mean that A could absorb a photon from electron B?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 15, 2015 #2

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Not true. Acceleration is invariant. Electron B will never appear to be accelerating.

    By acceleration we mean acceleration that can be measured by an accelerometer. An accelerometer in the accelerating frame of electron A will measure an acceleration and all observers will agree on this. However, an accelerometer in electron B's frame of reference will not measure an acceleration and, again, all observers will agree on this.
     
  4. Mar 15, 2015 #3
    Electron B should still experience an change in electric field direction that is equivalent to the change in electric fields that would be emitted from an accelerating Electron B
     
  5. Mar 15, 2015 #4

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    How so?
     
  6. Mar 16, 2015 #5
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/q89/s720x720/10306554_890128071029013_2650702652873704122_n.jpg?oh=48b1c7905c75c460f43c0011b05b62ee&oe=5587EF5F&__gda__=1434603337_872b3ab1b9f019de7972ac890fca7603
    Electron A accelerates along the large arrow , the change in electric field direction (Indicated by the smaller arrows) observed by electron A is Equivalent to the electric field change observed at B
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
  7. Mar 16, 2015 #6

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Are you talking about acceleration, which produces EM radiation, or about inertial motion?
     
  8. Mar 16, 2015 #7
    Acceleration
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Relativity and Photon Emission
  1. Photon emission (Replies: 2)

  2. Emission of a photon (Replies: 36)

Loading...