Second Order Differential Equation

  • #1
This is from an advanced college physics class, and I'm only in a Calc 1 right now. I've finished the whole problem except for this last part, which deals with a second order differential equation, which I don't know how to do yet.

Homework Statement


Givens: B, L, A, m, σ, θ (all are constant)
From what I have below, I need to get everything in terms of the givens, x, and t

Homework Equations


I have reduced everything down to this:
[PLAIN]http://img718.imageshack.us/img718/513/phy.png [Broken]
The first equation is from the problem, the second gets it in differential equation form.

The Attempt at a Solution


Like I said above, I've solved the whole problem except what I haven't learned how to do yet.


Thanks!
~Axe
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
vela
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Your differential equation isn't correct. It should be

[tex]\frac{B^2L^2\sigma A}{2L+2x}\frac{dx}{dt} = m\frac{dv}{dt} + mg \sin\theta[/tex]

You can integrate that with respect to t to find v in terms of x and t. Is that what you're solving for?
 

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