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B Seeing UV

  1. Apr 13, 2017 #1
    I understand that the wavelength of UV is too short to be absorbed by our cone cells, but I've came across 2 photos of evening primrose, which to our eyes are a dull yellow, but to insects (can see the UV light), it has a special pattern. My question is, I thought we're not able to see it. but how can we know it's it from the photo
     
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  3. Apr 13, 2017 #2

    ZapperZ

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    You want us to explain what you see in the photo without us actually seeing the photo?

    You might want to re-read your post again, because I don't quite understand what you're asking.

    Zz.
     
  4. Apr 13, 2017 #3
    Umm, my English is not good..but I'll try. So there were 2 photos of the same evening primrose. One showed it as the way we normal human will see it--yellow and without pattern; the other one showed it as the way bees see it--with special pattern. It is known that bees can see into UV range while human can't, so we shouldn't be able to see that pattern--it was not meant for us. My question is, how come we can see it from the photo? I mean, like for a color-blind person, they cannot see color even though we present them with colored photograph.
     
  5. Apr 13, 2017 #4

    ZapperZ

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    You DO know that (i) we have sensors that can detect UV light, or sensors that have a wider range than our eyes; and (ii) these sensors can then "translate" these varying frequencies into color scales that we can see?

    I mean, what do you think is happening in infra-red goggles that allows us to see at night?

    Zz.
     
  6. Apr 13, 2017 #5
    Ahh I never knew! What does this sensor call? I tried to google it but I can't find its principle. I'm interested to know if we can (or already did?) fit that in the fluorescent or uv microscope to observe the patterns that are normally invisible to us.
     
  7. Apr 13, 2017 #6

    berkeman

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    http://www.hamamatsu.com/jp/en/4005.html
     
  8. Apr 13, 2017 #7

    Andy Resnick

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    Not exactly- UV light is absorbed by other parts of your eye, depending on the wavelength. Don't look at UV sources, you will damage your eyes.

    There's a guy who does really nice UV and IR photography:

    http://www.naturfotograf.com/index2.html

    He explains a bit about assigning color to the UV and IR, but since those parts of the spectrum have no color (because of the way 'color' is defined), it's easy to assign false colors or some other palette as you see fit.
     
  9. Apr 14, 2017 #8

    A.T.

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    Nice pictures, but his website palette makes me want to see less colors, not more.
     
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