Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Homework Help: Solve for X: ln(x) + ln(x+1) = 1

  1. Feb 15, 2009 #1
    Im having trouble finding the solution to this problem, can any one walk me through this?

    So far I have:

    ln(x) + ln(x+1) = 1

    ln(x)(x+1) = 1

    e^1 = x(x+1)

    e^1 = x^2 + x

    This is where I get stuck.
    Am I on the right track?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2009 #2

    rock.freak667

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Yes this is correct. Write e^1 as just e, which is constant.
    If you move it to the other side you'll get:
    x2+x-e =0

    Now how do you solve the equation ax2+bx+c=0?
     
  4. Feb 15, 2009 #3
    I dont think x^2 + x - e = 0 can factor out, at least not without using the quadratic formula
     
  5. Feb 15, 2009 #4

    rock.freak667

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Then use the wquadratic equation formula and you'd solve for x.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook