Solving Electromagnet Problem with 24V 24A DC Power Supply

In summary, the individual is experiencing issues with using a 24V 24A DC power supply to power a 50 loop electromagnet using 22 gauge non-insulated copper wire and a small steel nail. They have tried using a 220 ohm resistor inline, but the magnetic field strength was low. They were surprised to find that using two D batteries had a much stronger magnetic field. They are seeking advice on how to make the electromagnet work with the power supply. One possible explanation is that the current is too low for a strong magnetic field.
  • #1
StephenDoty
265
0
Hello All!

I have a 24V 24A DC power supply that I am trying to hook a 50 loop electromagnet using 22 gauge non insulated copper wire and a small steel nail. Every time I hook the electromagnet to the power supply it sparks and Humms. So I put a 220 ohm resistor inline and it did not spark but there was almost no magnetic field strength. When I hooked my electromagnet to two D batteries that I tapped together using electrical tape the magnetic field was SOOO much stronger than when I hooked it up to the power supply. What?!? That shouldn't happen. It should be the opposite. What am I doing wrong? Is there something else I can put inline besides the resistor so that the magnetic field will be strong? I really want to use the power supply to power the electromagnet. How can I make this work?


Thanks everyone.
Stephen
 
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  • #2
bump...

I would really like to know how I can get my electromagnet to work with my 24V 24A DC power supply. Any Ideas?
 
  • #3
StephenDoty said:
bump...

I would really like to know how I can get my electromagnet to work with my 24V 24A DC power supply. Any Ideas?

Easy, you don't have very much current (24V / 220 Ohm is about 0.1 A) Since the field is proportional (roughly) to the current, you don't have a very high magnetic field.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnet#Magnetic_field_created_by_a_current
 

Related to Solving Electromagnet Problem with 24V 24A DC Power Supply

1. How do I calculate the voltage and current required for my electromagnet?

To calculate the voltage and current required for your electromagnet, you need to know the number of turns in the coil, the cross-sectional area of the core, and the desired strength of the magnetic field. You can use the formula V = N x B x A, where V is the voltage, N is the number of turns, B is the magnetic field strength, and A is the cross-sectional area. For example, if you have 100 turns in your coil, a core with a cross-sectional area of 5 cm², and you want a magnetic field strength of 2 Tesla, the required voltage would be 100 x 2 x 5 = 1000 volts.

2. Can I use a 24V 24A DC power supply for my electromagnet?

Yes, you can use a 24V 24A DC power supply for your electromagnet. However, the strength of your electromagnet will depend on the number of turns in the coil and the cross-sectional area of the core. If you require a stronger magnetic field, you may need to use a higher voltage or amperage power supply.

3. How do I ensure the safety of my electromagnet and power supply?

To ensure the safety of your electromagnet and power supply, you should always follow the manufacturer's instructions and guidelines. It is important to use a power supply that is rated for the correct voltage and amperage, and to never exceed these limits. You should also regularly check for any damage or wear on the power supply and electromagnet, and replace them if necessary.

4. Can I vary the voltage and current to control the strength of my electromagnet?

Yes, you can vary the voltage and current to control the strength of your electromagnet. By increasing the voltage, you can increase the magnetic field strength, and by increasing the current, you can increase the number of turns in the coil. However, it is important to note that exceeding the recommended voltage or amperage can damage your electromagnet and power supply.

5. How do I troubleshoot any issues with my electromagnet?

If you are experiencing issues with your electromagnet, the first step is to check the connections and wiring to ensure everything is securely connected. You should also check the power supply to make sure it is providing the correct voltage and current. If the issue persists, you may need to check the coil and core for any damage or wear, and replace them if necessary.

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