How to Optimize a simple Electromagnet

In summary: I am just making this for class, but those were the specs I was given to make.I do not think I will be able to bend the bar ( I assume you are talking about a horseshoe electromagnet). My options are to cut the iron core in half and line it up side by side, or keep turning the coils around the iron.Do you think that would be the best approach?Berkeman had the right idea... reduce air gap and encourage flux to stay in it.
  • #1
Chadvad
4
0
My goal is to make an electromagnet that delivers 100mT magnetic field on one end of the iron. The iron core has a diameter 2.0mm and length 0.1m. I am using a copper wire that can carry 2.3A of current, and I am using a DC power supply.
I have been able to create a 100mT magnetic field on the end of the iron, but I now I need the 100mT magnetic field to be present 1-3 mm away from the end of the electromagnet.
I do know the formulas and have calculated the different variable for the magnetic field using:
B(end) = (kuNI)/2L..
What should I do to optimize the magnetic field:
1. Cut the iron in half and combine the two pieces to make a stronger core?
2. Simply wrap more coils around iron? (I heard this may cause faster wire burning)
 
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  • #2
Chadvad said:
My goal is to make an electromagnet that delivers 100mT magnetic field on one end of the iron. The iron core has a diameter 2.0mm and length 0.1m. I am using a copper wire that can carry 2.3A of current, and I am using a DC power supply.
I have been able to create a 100mT magnetic field on the end of the iron, but I now I need the 100mT magnetic field to be present 1-3 mm away from the end of the electromagnet.
I do know the formulas and have calculated the different variable for the magnetic field using:
B(end) = (kuNI)/2L..
What should I do to optimize the magnetic field:
1. Cut the iron in half and combine the two pieces to make a stronger core?
2. Simply wrap more coils around iron? (I heard this may cause faster wire burning)
Welcome to the PF.

Can you say what the field is for? How uniform does it need to be in the volume that is 1-3mm away from one end of the bar?

One way to make it stronger is to bend your bar around so the two ends face each other and are about 5mm apart. Can you do this?
 
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  • #3
berkeman said:
Welcome to the PF.

Can you say what the field is for? How uniform does it need to be in the volume that is 1-3mm away from one end of the bar?

One way to make it stronger is to bend your bar around so the two ends face each other and are about 5mm apart. Can you do this?
I am just making this for class, but those were the specs I was given to make.
I do not think I will be able to bend the bar ( I assume you are talking about a horseshoe electromagnet).
My options are to cut the iron core in half and line it up side by side, or keep turning the coils around the iron.
Do you think that would be the best approach?
 
  • #4
Berkeman had the right idea... reduce air gap and encourage flux to stay in it.Can you surround your iron bar with a magnetic path ?

upload_2016-4-28_19-31-40.png


6 inches is .15 meter
clamp your core and epoxy it in place at the fixed end . A small block of wood drilled to 3/32" will give you more glueing surface.
Now you have an adjustable air gap which gives you control of the the dominant L in your flux equation
 
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  • #5
You have to find out the optimum discharge current to get the best battery life. Also, you have to optimize your magnet design, especially the coil, to match your battery.
 

Related to How to Optimize a simple Electromagnet

1. How do I determine the optimal number of turns for my electromagnet?

The optimal number of turns for an electromagnet is dependent on the specific application and desired strength of the magnet. In general, increasing the number of turns will increase the strength of the magnet, but there is a point of diminishing returns. It is recommended to experiment with different numbers of turns and measure the resulting magnetic field strength to find the optimal number for your specific needs.

2. What is the best core material for an electromagnet?

The best core material for an electromagnet depends on the desired strength and application. Some common materials used for cores include iron, steel, and ferrite. Iron and steel are good choices for strong magnets, while ferrite is better for weaker magnets. It is also important to consider the shape and size of the core, as this can affect the magnetic field produced.

3. How can I increase the strength of my electromagnet?

There are several ways to increase the strength of an electromagnet. One way is to increase the number of turns in the coil, as mentioned in the first question. Another way is to increase the current flowing through the coil. Additionally, using a stronger core material or making the core larger can also increase the strength of the magnet. It is important to note that there is a limit to how strong an electromagnet can be, as too much current can cause the coil to overheat and potentially damage the magnet.

4. Can I use a different power source for my electromagnet?

Yes, you can use a different power source for your electromagnet as long as it meets the voltage and current requirements of the magnet. Electromagnets typically require a direct current (DC) power source, so make sure to check the specifications of your specific magnet before using a different power source. It is also important to use a power source with enough capacity to handle the current needed for your electromagnet.

5. How can I make my electromagnet more efficient?

To make your electromagnet more efficient, you can use a larger core and increase the number of turns in the coil. This will create a stronger magnetic field with less current. Additionally, using a power source with higher voltage can also increase the efficiency of the magnet. It is also important to minimize any gaps between the core and the coil, as this can decrease the strength of the magnet. Lastly, using a core with a high magnetic permeability, such as iron or steel, can also increase the efficiency of the electromagnet.

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