Solving for resistor values in voltage divider circuit

  • Engineering
  • Thread starter EddNeedsHelp
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  • #1

Homework Statement


So I was studying an example and the picture given simply asked to setup a voltage divider for the values without solving for resistance. However... I want to know if I'm missing something or if this can even be solved:
I attached the problem below.

Homework Equations


V1=Vs*R1/(R1+R2) VDR

The Attempt at a Solution


So I setup the circuit with 5 resistors in series with the ground after the first 3 resistors. However, when I try to solve for a voltage drop I get -15 on one side, so can't the other side with the negative values only be 9? Is it even possible to get a voltage drop of 15 originally and end up with -15 on the other side, considering the Vs is 24 v? Or are these values just not solvable?
 

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Answers and Replies

  • #2
phinds
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(1) A 30 volt swing with a 24V supply is not possible without an active circuit.
(2) This is a rather stupid design request since unless the current draw from each of the voltages is utterly trivial, a passive resistance divider circuit is a non-starter as a decent design mechanism.
 
  • #3
NascentOxygen
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For the purpose of the exercise, perhaps assume the supply is 30V.

Or for a little more challenge, assume the supply is ±24V.
 

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